antiinflammatory


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antiinflammatory

 [an″te-in-flam´ah-tor-e]
1. counteracting or suppressing inflammation.
2. an agent that so acts.

an·ti·in·flam·ma·to·ry

(an'tē-in-flam'ă-tō-rē),
Reducing inflammation by acting on body responses, without directly antagonizing the causative agent; denoting agents such as glucocorticoids and aspirin.

an·ti·in·flam·ma·to·ry

(an'tē-in-flam'ă-tōr-ē)
Reducing inflammation by acting on body responses, without directly antagonizing the causative agent; denoting agents such as glucocorticoids and aspirin.

an·ti·in·flam·ma·to·ry

(an'tē-in-flam'ă-tōr-ē)
Reducing inflammation by acting on body responses, without directly antagonizing the causative agent; denoting agents such as glucocorticoids and aspirin.

Patient discussion about antiinflammatory

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents? My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.

A. Padded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

More discussions about antiinflammatory
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the results obtained, few studies isolated the bioactive compounds to be further analyzed for the antiinflammatory activity such as flavonoids (boesenbergin A, eupatorin, and sinensetin), coumarins (scopoletin and scoparone), triterpenoids (dammara-20,24-dien-3-one and 24-hydroxydammara-20,25-dien-3-one), steroids (cucurbitacin E), curcuminoids (monodemethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin), benzophenones (garsubellin A and garcinielliptin oxide), cinnamic acid (ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate), alkaloids (kokusaginine), benzene (p-O-geranylcoumaric acid), 4-[(20-O-acetyl-[alpha]-L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate, 4-[(30-O-acetyl-[alpha]-L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate, and 4-[(40-O-acetyl-[alpha]-L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate [28, 30, 32, 33, 35, 38, 41, 45-47].
Being a privileged scaffold, coumarins are reported to have bioactivities such as anticoagulant [3], anti-HIV [4, 5], antioxidant [6, 7], antibacterial [8], antiinflammatory [9, 10], anticancer [11], and dyslipidemic [12] activities.
Carrageenan-induced inflammation in the rat paw is a classical model of edema formation and hyperalgesia that has been extensively used in the development of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors.
The value of stained proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators was determined by the formula: stained cells/stained cells of control x 100.
(10.) Rathee P, Choudhary H, Rathee S, Rathee D, Kumar V; Mechanism of action of flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents; A review.
The pentacyclic triterpenes reported previous for antiinflammatory and antipyretic activities in vitro as well in vivo (Souza et al., 2014; Geetha and Varalakshmi, 2001; Safayhi and Sailer, 1997; Aguirre et al., 2006; Banno et al., 2006; Otuki et al., 2005).
There would be the double effect of protection from gastrointestinal side effects plus enhanced antiinflammatory activity.
Antiinflammatory drugs available without a prescription include ibuprofen (Advil[TM], Motrin[TM], and generic brands) and naproxen (Aleve[TM] and generic brands).
recently reported the results of a population-based, case-control study regarding risk factors for pediatric invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection (1), noting that the "new" use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), defined as NSAID use <2 weeks before diagnosis, was associated with invasive GAS infection, whereas self-defined "regular" NSAID use was not.
Instead, drug companies have concentrated on aspirin, ibuprofen, cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, and other antiinflammatory drugs that block a single biochemical pathway but don't protect EETs.
Dahmen, et al., Boswellic Acid, a Potent Antiinflammatory Drug, Inhibits Rejection to the Same Extent as High Dose Steroids, Transplant Proc., 33, 539 (2001); H.P.
Carrageenan-induced oedema in hind paw of rat as an assay for antiinflammatory drugs.