antihypotensive

antihypotensive

 [an″te-, an″ti-hi″po-ten´siv]
1. counteracting low blood pressure.
2. an agent that counteracts low blood pressure.

an·ti·hy·po·ten·sive

(an'tē-hī'pō-ten'siv),
Any measure or medication that tends to raise reduced blood pressure.

an·ti·hy·po·ten·sive

(an'tē-hī'pō-ten'siv)
Any measure or medication that tends to raise low blood pressure.

an·ti·hy·po·ten·sive

(an'tē-hī'pō-ten'siv)
Any measure or medication that tends to raise reduced blood pressure.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Only 15% of clinicians utilised echocardiography to escalate or change antihypotensive therapy.
The most common antihypotensive combination was dopamine, dobutamine and adrenaline as first-, second- and third- line, respectively (Fig.
Various attempts have been undertaken to investigate the positive effects of pharmacological antihypotensive therapy on mental functioning (Duschek et al.
Studies investigating the effects of antihypotensive drugs on extended time base are rare.
Recent researches showed that it also had anti-HIV, antioxidative, antihypotensive, and cytotoxic activities [14].
The patient should be observed for the possible development of arrhythmias and hypotension; if required, appropriate antiarrhythmic and antihypotensive therapy should be given.
If postural hypotension persists despite these measures, a physician may order an antihypotensive agent such as fludrocortisone or midodrine (Mathias & Kimber, 1999).
The positive association between the increase in blood pressure and cognitive enhancement suggests that blood pressure plays a casual role in the cognitive deficits in hypotension and underlines that they can be reduced through antihypotensive treatment.
First attempts have been undertaken to investigate the effects of pharmacological antihypotensive therapy on mental functioning (Duschek et al., 2007a).
Among available antihypotensive drugs, only few orally administered preparations suitable for treatment have the desired effect (Oldenburg et al.
Among the available antihypotensive drugs, only few orally applied preparations suitable for long-term treatment have the desired effect (Oldenburg et al., 1999).
Exclusion criteria were therapy with antihypotensive agents or migraine medications; myocardial infarction; stroke; renal or hepatic diseases; allergy to the ingredients; overweight; underweight; and participation in another drug study.