antihormone

antihormone

 [an″te-hor´mōn]
a substance that counteracts a hormone.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

antihormone

(1) An obsolete, nonspecific term for any agent that inhibits or counteracts the action of a hormone. 
(2) Chalone.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

antihormone

Endocrinology A natural or synthetic analogue of a hormone–eg, FSH, LH, which binds to the hormone's receptor, blocking its activity. See B/I ratio.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·ti·hor·mone

(an'tē-hōr'mōn)
Any substance demonstrable in serum that inhibits or prevents the usual effects of certain hormones, e.g., specific antibodies.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The FDA cautions that consumers and health care professionals "should not use the test results to determine any treatments, including antihormone therapies and prophylactic removal of the breasts or ovaries." Decisions should be made only after confirmatory testing and genetic counseling, they said.
5 8 > 900.000 kr 6 3 Smoker (YES/NO/EX-SMOKER) 5/16/7 5/14/7 Type of surgery Mastectomy + axillary 1 3 dissection +/- SN Mastectomy + SN 4 3 Lumpectomy + axillary 6 6 dissection +/- SN Lumpectomy + SN 16 12 Lumpectomy [right arrow] 1 0 mastectomy + SN Bilateral lumpectomy + SN + 0 2 axillary dissection Surgery duration (min) 92 (74.5-125) 125 (104.5-156.5) Anaesthesia duration (min) 155 (130-187) 190 (155-225) Oncological treatment ([double dagger]) None 3 3 Radiation 5 6 Chemotherapy 16 7 Chemotherapy + radiation 0 0 Radiation x 1 only 3 1 Antihormone ([double dagger]) 20/7 10/7 (no/yes (femar/letrozol/ tamoxifen)) MDI baseline 6.5 (4-12.5) 7 (4.5-10) Values are frequencies or median (25-75% IQR).
(1) HR positive breast cancer exhibits a favorable response to antihormone therapies such as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (Als).
Knowing that antihormone therapies and inhibitors of EGFR/HER2 are already used for therapy of breast cancer [93, 94], we propose that patients diagnosed with high TNF[alpha], estrogen, and EGF levels would benefit from targeting all three arms simultaneously and that clinicians should consider the possibility of treating such patients with a cocktail of all three modalities: TNF[alpha] inhibitors + antihormonal therapies + inhibitors of EGFR/HER2.
It is becoming apparent that the inappropriate activation of growth factor signalling pathways plays a prominent role in the promotion of antihormone failure in breast cancer cells where bi-directional cross-talk between oestrogen receptor and growth factor signalling pathways can sustain tumour growth in the presence of these agents.
For example, estrogen receptor status is not only prognostic and predictive of response to antihormone therapy, but also predictive of response to chemotherapy (the presence of the estrogen receptor is associated with less benefit from chemotherapy).
On October 25, 1988, Roussel-UCLAF announced suspension of distribution in France and elsewhere due to "French and foreign public opinion and the controversy raised by the possibility of using the antihormone mifepristone (RU 486) to voluntarily interrupt pregnancy." (43) Two days later, there was an international outcry over the suspension of distribution, (44) including a petition signed by more than 1,000 doctors who were attending a meeting in Rio de Janeiro.
Tamoxifen, an antihormone drug prescribed for postbreast surgery, costs approximately $75 a week to use, enthusiastically recommended by the attending physician for a five-year period: a $20,000 drug bill that is only part of the postperative treatment!
Whether the diagnosis is made early for an in situ lesion or late for a metastatic tumor, recommended treatment nearly always involves a combination of surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and antihormone therapies.
On the constituents of medicinal plants with hormone and antihormone like action.
Modulation of the ligand-independent activation of the human estrogen receptor by hormone and antihormone. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90(13):6120-6124.
Figure 1: Number of drugs added in the 19th essential medicine lists Addition of drugs in 19th EML 19th EML 18th EML Vaccines 23 21 Implantable/Intravaginal contraceptives 3 1 Intrauterine devices 2 1 Disinfectants 4 3 Medicines affecting coagulation 10 8 Hormones and antihormones 8 5 Cytotoxic and adjuvant medicines 38 25 Antiretroviral FDCs 6 5 Antituberculosis medicines 23 19 Anticonvulsants/Antiepileptics 10 8 Note: Table made from bar graph.