vitamin K

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vi·ta·min K

generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork, liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils, essential for the formation of normal amounts of prothrombin.

vitamin K

n.
A fat-soluble vitamin, occurring in leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, and egg yolks, that promotes blood clotting and prevents hemorrhaging. It exists in several related forms, such as K1 and K2.

vitamin K1

n.
A yellow viscous oil, C31H46O2, found in leafy green vegetables or made synthetically, used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called phylloquinone.

vitamin K2

n.
A crystalline compound, C41H56O2, isolated from putrefied fish meal or from various intestinal bacteria, used to stop hemorrhaging and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called menaquinone.

vitamin K

a group of fat-soluble vitamins known as quinones that are essential for the synthesis of prothrombin in the liver and of several related proteins involved in the clotting of blood. The vitamin is widely distributed in foods, especially leafy green vegetables, pork liver, yogurt, egg yolk, kelp, alfalfa, fish-liver oils, and blackstrap molasses, and is synthesized by the bacterial flora of the GI tract. It is also produced synthetically. Deficiency results in hypoprothrombinemia, characterized by poor coagulation of the blood and hemorrhage, and usually occurs from inadequate absorption of the vitamin from the GI tract or the inability to use it in the liver. It is used to reduce the clotting time in patients with obstructive jaundice and in hemorrhagic states associated with intestinal diseases and diseases of the liver; it is given prophylactically to infants to prevent hemorrhagic disease of the newborn. Natural vitamin K is stored in the body and produces no toxicity. Excessive doses of synthetic vitamin K may cause anemia in newborns and hemolysis in people with glucose-6-phosphate deficiency. See also vitamin K1, vitamin K2, menadione.

vitamin K

A general term for the structurally similar fat-soluble vitamins (K1, K2, K3) required for the hepatic synthesis of prothrombin; coagulant factors VII, IX and X; and 2-methyl-1,4 naphthoquinone and its derivatives, which have antihaemorrhagic activity.

Dietary sources
Cheese, green tea, leafy greens, liver, oats, egg yolks.

vi·ta·min K

(vī'tă-min)
Generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils, essential for the formation of normal amounts of prothrombin.

vitamin K

or

phylloquinone

a fat-soluble molecule found in spinach, cabbage, kale and pig's liver. The vitamin is essential in the synthesis of prothrombin used in BLOOD CLOTTING. A deficiency causes an increase in clotting time.

vitamin K

group of haemostable compounds essential to formation of normal amounts of prothrombin

vitamin K,

n a fat-soluble vitamin found in leafy greens, beans, peas, oats, and whole wheat. Has been used to remedy deficiencies (including those associated with alcoholism, Crohn's disease, diarrhea, and ulcerative colitis), osteoporosis, and menorrhagia. Pregnant women taking anticonvulsants may need to supplement vitamin K to prevent birth defects. Contraindicated for patients taking warfarin and caution with cephalosporins. Also called
menadione, menaquinone, or
phylloquinone.

vi·ta·min K

(vī'tă-min)
Generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork, liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils.

vitamin K

a group of fat-soluble compounds which are required for the formation of prothrombin and therefore play a role in blood clotting. They are present in most green feeds and are not likely to be absent from natural diets. Failure to absorb the vitamin is a real risk in diseases in which fat absorption is defective, such as obstructive jaundice.

vitamin K K deficiency
most commonly due to anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs, and less often cats.
vitamin K K1
phylloquinone.
vitamin K K2
menaquinone.
vitamin K K3
menadione.