palindrome

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pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm),
In molecular biology, a self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5' to 3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (for example, 5'-AGTTGA-3') on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions (for example, binding sites, sites cleaved by restriction enzymes); imperfect palindromes exist, as do interrupted palindromes that allow the formation of loops.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]

palindrome

(păl′ĭn-drōm′)
n.
A segment of double-stranded DNA in which the nucleotide sequence of one strand reads in reverse order to that of the complementary strand.

pal′in·dro′mic (-drō′mĭk, -drŏm′ĭk) adj.
Etymology A word, phrase, number or other sequence of units that can be read the same way in either direction—adjustment of punctuation and spaces between words is permitted
Molecular biology Inverted repeat A sequence of duplex DNA or RNA with dyad symmetry that reads the same in the 5’ to 3’ direction on complementary strands; DNA-binding proteins may recognise palindromes.

pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm)
molecular biology A self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5'-3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (but same 5'- to 3'- direction) on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]
Palindromeclick for a larger image
Fig. 243 Palindrome .

palindrome

a sequence in double-stranded nucleic acids that reads the same on both strands when reading one strand from left to right and the other from right to left (i.e. both strands are read 5′ 3′). See Fig. 243 .In a single-stranded molecule, COMPLEMENTARY BASE PAIRING can occur when the chain is folded back (See also HAIRPIN). Palindromes occur in, for example, many operator sequences (see OPERON MODEL), transcription terminator sequences (see TRANSCRIPTION).and most recognition sites for RESTRICTION ENZYMES.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Six more possible antigrams are all grammatically unparallel words.
In 1991, I used my recently-acquired computer to assemble a set of 8876 anagrams and antigrams drawn from "Anagrammasia," a collection drawn from early puzzle publications by Newton B.
Astute as he was, Pulliam surely noticed but failed to mention that many of these words, with an apt rearrangement of the other letters (which he presents only as alphomes), can make good anagrams about palindromes--definitives, antigrams and cognates.
In the November 2009 Kickshaws, eve Michaelsen presented a selection of antigrams (antonymic anagrams) from various sources, but excluded mention of any from Word Ways.