antifreeze

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antifreeze

A fluid with a high concentration of ethylene glycol or methanol, which is added to car, truck and other cooling systems for internal combustion engines to substantially reduce the freezing point of the coolant.

Antifreeze has long had currency as a surrogate inebriant despite it being associated with acidosis and renal shutdown (due to ethylene glycol), as well as blindness (due to methanol).

Clinical findings
In low amounts, antifreeze simulates alcohol metabolism; at high levels, it is associated with nausea, vomiting, seizures, coma or death (at levels above 100 ml of ethylene glycol).

antifreeze

Toxicology A fluid with a high concentration of ethylene glycol or methanol, which is added to car, truck, and other cooling systems for internal combustion engines to substantially ↓ the freezing point of the coolant; antifreeze has long had currency as a surrogate inebriant, despite its being associated with acidosis and renal shutdown–ethylene glycol and blindness–methanol Clinical In low amounts, antifreeze simulates alcohol metabolism; at high levels, it is associated with N&V, seizures, coma, death, at levels above 100 ml of ethylene glycol. See Leukovorin rescue. Methotrexatre
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the antifreeze liquids were recycled, only replacing that absorbed by the catch with an amount sufficient to maintain levels at 300 mL.
In accordance with prior experience, both antifreeze formulations captured far more flies than those with water/surfactant as the capture liquid.
Because the additives in antifreeze are proprietary the material safety data sheets provided by the manufacturer list only those compounds which are considered to be significant safety hazards when used in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.
The additives in Low Tox antifreeze, according to the MSDS, comprise approx.
No one knows exactly how the insect antifreeze proteins work, but they seem to bind to the surface of tiny ice crystals and inhibit their growth, Graham says (SN: 11/26/86, p.
"We have solved the structure for fish antifreeze, so we know how it binds to ice, but it doesn't mean that the insect ones will bind in the same manner."
Grown with the budworm protein, however, the ice crystals look like smooth, hexagonal disks, which would cause less damage to cells preserved with antifreeze, he suggests.
If that were the case, each antifreeze would have the same preferred sites where the polar areas would fit into the crystal lattice.
Several new results, along with some research reported a few months ago at an American Chemical Society meeting in Anaheim, Calif., provide important hints about how antifreeze proteins may prevent crystals from growing.
Instead, its effectiveness peaks when antifreeze levels reach about 4 percent by weight.
The adsorption of antifreeze glycoproteins on an ice surface, says biochemist Robert E.
The researchers differ, however, over how firmly the antifreeze proteins bond to ice surfaces.