antiepileptic drugs


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

antiepileptic drugs

Drugs used to prevent, or reduce the liability to, epileptic seizures. They include SODIUM VALPROATE, CARBAMAZEPINE, ACETAZOLAMIDE, LAMOTRIGINE, PHENOBARBITONE (phenobarbital), CLONAZEPAM, PHENYTOIN, CLOBAZAM and GABAPENTIN.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings highlight the importance of future studies on the risk-benefit ratio of antiepileptic drugs in old adults and especially in those with Alzheimer's disease.
"Although several antiepileptic drugs have been associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), the class effect and impact of other AEDs are not well described," Eric P.
KUOPIO, Finland -- Antiepileptic drug use is associated with an increased risk of stroke among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
In this phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients aged 2-65 years with tuberous sclerosis complex and treatment-resistant seizures receiving one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs were included.
The prolonged use of antiepileptic drugs is also associated with various types of mild-to-severe, established, and unavoidable adverse effects in the patients.
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, DZNE, stated that continuous use of antiepileptic drugs for a period exceeding one year was associated with a 15 percent increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the Finnish dataset, and with a 30 percent increased risk of dementia in the German dataset.
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the German Centre for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), suggests that there is an association between the use of antiepileptic drugs and an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, Manufacturing Chemist reported on Monday.
The use of antiepileptic drugs is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE).
A SUBSTANTIAL PORTION of older adults with epilepsy who are on Medicare receive prescriptions for antiepileptic drugs and nonepilepsy drugs that can interact to alter their effectiveness or induce toxicity, according to a retrospective analysis of a claims database.
Epilepsy has no relation with age, race, socio-geographic or national boundaries.3 Different drugs for the treatment of epilepsy are available but the most common treatment for epilepsy is monotherapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and about 50% patients are treated successfully with monotherapy.4 Carbamazepine (CBZ) is used as a first line drug to control different forms of epilepsy.
Delhi, March 21 -- Market growth can be attributed to factors such as rising incidence of neurological disorders, growing disease awareness, introduction of novel antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), strong government support and initiatives.