anticipatory anxiety

anticipatory anxiety

Psychiatry Anxiety caused by an expectation of anxiety or panic in a particular situation. See performance anxiety.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypnotherapy has shown modest efficacy in treatment of anticipatory anxiety symptoms, headache, chronic pain, nausea and vomiting, migraines, hair-pulling and skin picking as well as compulsive eating and smoking cessation in adults.
At the "Olympic level" we find there is no anticipatory anxiety when the stress of pain is certain to come, and no lingering aftereffects--unlike the stress reactions in ordinary folk.
The test anxiety provoking stimuli reported by the students prior to the performance support the Ping, Subramaniam, and Krishnaswamy (2008) study which suggested that students frequently experience test anxiety before the evaluative situation because of their anticipatory anxiety about exams.
The aim was to help people to relax as much as possible before the start of the registration, trying to avoid anticipatory anxiety.
The tell-show-do reduces anticipatory anxiety in a new patient.
Do you have high levels of anticipatory anxiety prior to a flight?
Descriptions of the examination day can let novice candidates have a realistic appraisal of the situation and thus any anticipatory anxiety can be much lowered.
Barlow (2000) characterizes anticipatory anxiety as a state of helplessness triggered by an individual's perceived inability to predict, control and obtain desired results in the context of upcoming events.
In this study of films offering future scenarios of climate change, the author presents the idea of pretraumatic stress syndrome, arguing that in pretrauma, people suffer from anticipatory anxiety about the future.
Each item, rated on a 5-point Likert scale, is carefully anchored and assesses panic frequency, distress during panic, panic-focused anticipatory anxiety, phobic avoidance of situations, phobic avoidance of physical sensations, impairment in work functioning, and impairment in social functioning.
Compared to study participants without back pain, participants with chronic back pain who were subjected to a pain stimulus were found to have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol, smaller volume of a brain region called the hippocampus (involved in emotions, learning, and short-term memory), and greater activity in a related brain area involved in anticipatory anxiety and associative learning.