anticipate

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anticipate

 [an-tis´ĭ-pāt]
to expect a given reaction from someone, such as a patient.

an·tic·i·pate

(an-tis'i-pāt),
To come before the appointed time; said of a periodic symptom or disease, such as a malarial paroxysm, when it recurs at progressively shorter intervals.
[L. anticipo, pp. -cipatus, to anticipate, fr. anti (old form of ante), before, + capio, to take]

anticipate

(an-tis′ĭ-pāt″) [L. anticapare, to take before]
1. To occur before the usual time of onset (of a particular illness or disease).
2. In nursing and medicine, to expect, predict, or prepare for something outside the routine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anticipators had engaged in significantly more risky behaviors than delayers (1.
The different background profiles of anticipators and delayers suggest the presence of two contrasting contexts that influence the transition to first intercourse: Delayers appear to be more invested in deferring intercourse, and may be supported by their ties to parents and church.
Thirteen percent of delayers and 53% of anticipators initiated intercourse within a year of the 1988 survey (not shown), and the difference was statistically significant (p<.
We postulate that either anticipators initiate intercourse because of rebellion against family rules or their parents form more rules in response to the adolescents' involvement in high-risk behaviors.
By far the largest difference between delayers and anticipators was in the effect of having a mother who gave birth as a teenager.
Overall, the model was more predictive of the transition to sexual activity among anticipators than delayers.
Our findings generally support the conclusions of Whitaker and colleagues (20)--that is, the sexual behavior of anticipators occurs in a higher-risk context than that of delayers.
Delayers are more disapproving of premarital sex than anticipators, and they may have internalized the decision to postpone first sex as well as a decision not to participate in other risky behaviors.
In contrast, anticipators are likely to need instruction regarding the risks and consequences of sexual activity as well as contraceptive use and safer-sex practices.
Our findings suggest that they may need to focus on reducing the involvement of all youth in precoital activities and the involvement of anticipators in other risky behaviors, as well as on encouraging the deferment of sexual activity among delayers.
23) Our data did not permit us to determine the attitude of the mother toward premarital sex or teenage childbearing and whether her approval explains the effects of maternal fertility on anticipators.