anticipate

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anticipate

 [an-tis´ĭ-pāt]
to expect a given reaction from someone, such as a patient.

an·tic·i·pate

(an-tis'i-pāt),
To come before the appointed time; said of a periodic symptom or disease, such as a malarial paroxysm, when it recurs at progressively shorter intervals.
[L. anticipo, pp. -cipatus, to anticipate, fr. anti (old form of ante), before, + capio, to take]

anticipate

(an-tis′ĭ-pāt″) [L. anticapare, to take before]
1. To occur before the usual time of onset (of a particular illness or disease).
2. In nursing and medicine, to expect, predict, or prepare for something outside the routine.
References in periodicals archive ?
ability, they probably cannot perform the computation anticipatorily,
The book had a mirror-world quality, as though the former journalist, waiting for the accrual of his reputation and for a favorable economy, were anticipatorily remaking the world in print (and blueprint).
President and the Congress could agree anticipatorily to give away the
(14.) In estimating our time series models, we varied the timing of the events by one and two months to allow for the possibility that the firm adjusted, either anticipatorily or with a lag, to new managers, union leaders, strikes, or slowdowns, and found that our basic results were robust in spite of these changes in timing.
Nevertheless, coins were issued by both Cossutia's family and Caesar's describing her anticipatorily as "Uxor Caesaris"--hence, no doubt, the confusion.
Moreover, the Supreme Court has suggested, in dicta, that an individual may not assert the Miranda-Edwards Fifth Amendment right to counsel anticipatorily.(238) This right is intended to protect a person against the inherent pressures of custodial interrogation and "[m]ost rights must be asserted when the government seeks to take the action they protect against."(239) Consequently, many courts will not recognize a defendant's earlier anticipatory assertion of his Fifth Amendment right to counsel at a later police interrogation.(240)
the Dilacor Agreements." The lawsuit further alleges that Watson's April 19 letter specifically asked Rhone-Poulenc to "provide Watson with assurance of [Rhone-Poulenc's] intention to comply with their obligations under the Dilacor Agreements, including their obligation to cause Aventis Pharma AG to divest itself of Cardizem." According to the lawsuit, Rhone-Poulenc "failed to provide the assurances reasonably requested by Watson and thereby anticipatorily breached the Dilacor Agreements."
"Pocket veto" is the popular term for the ability of the President, under another part of Article I section 7, to veto a bill simply by not signing it, if "the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its return."(6) Thus, President Clinton could simply announce his intention not to agree to any conviction and expulsion from office based on the House's expired articles of impeachment and that they are hereby anticipatorily pocket-vetoed.
Hall and Dodge allowed taxpayers to avoid taxation on contingent income that was anticipatorily assigned to another, the fact that income is contingent on some future event is only one factor the courts use to determine tax consequences.
You can create time anticipatorily - you can have an idea of what movement you want to make, choreographing the movement, which you then perform with your hand.
But the painting could be a kind of Annunciation, the woman anticipatorily pregnant and the magical luminosity of the room the presence of the Holy Spirit.