anticipate

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anticipate

 [an-tis´ĭ-pāt]
to expect a given reaction from someone, such as a patient.

an·tic·i·pate

(an-tis'i-pāt),
To come before the appointed time; said of a periodic symptom or disease, such as a malarial paroxysm, when it recurs at progressively shorter intervals.
[L. anticipo, pp. -cipatus, to anticipate, fr. anti (old form of ante), before, + capio, to take]

anticipate

(an-tis′ĭ-pāt″) [L. anticapare, to take before]
1. To occur before the usual time of onset (of a particular illness or disease).
2. In nursing and medicine, to expect, predict, or prepare for something outside the routine.
References in periodicals archive ?
A group of poems, principally those which open the collection, can nevertheless be read as postmodern or at least as developing interestingly and unexpectedly: "Land Window," "The Map," "Love Walking," "Left With You," and others share an energy of the not-quite- anticipatable yet at the same time contrive a coherently forceful impact.
It is anticipatable, its causes are easily identified and it could be prevented.
Our evidence of the superiority of Fischer's model thus supports the view that anticipatable monetary policy can have real effects, but that these effects differ from those following unanticipated policy changes.
(vii) refraining from consorting with specified types of people, frequenting specified types of places, or engaging in specified business, employment, or professional activities, to the extent that such restrictions have a reasonable relationship with the prior offense or anticipatable future criminal behavior;
When financial disclosure is imposed by rule-making, the initial balancing appears all too often to reflect hoped-for benefits without real consideration of anticipatable costs.
Proposer Shall Include An Estimated Budget For Any Reasonably Anticipatable Maintenance, Repair, Modernization/renovation And/or Replacements.
See supra note 145 (noting a risk that was anticipatable, but not anticipated by the relevant regulatory authorities).
The anticipatable combinations of relevant factors are few, and this entails a relative indeterminacy in our initial aim of a fair rate .