anticholinesterase


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anticholinesterase

 [an″te-, an″ti-ko″lin-es´ter-ās]
an agent that inhibits acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine at junctions of cholinergic nerve endings and effector organs or postsynaptic neurons; this permits the accumulation of acetylcholine and increases the stimulation of cholinergic receptors in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Called also cholinesterase inhibitor.

Organophosphate insecticides and chemical-warfare agents (nerve gases) are highly toxic “irreversible” anticholinesterases; “reversible” anticholinesterases such as neostigmine and physostigmine are used for treatment of myasthenia gravis, glaucoma, and smooth muscle atony of the gastrointestinal tract and for termination of the effect of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and cholinergic blocking agents. Poisoning by anticholinesterases is treated with atropine and the cholinesterase reactivator pralidoxime.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(an'tē-kō-lin-es'ter-ās),
One of the drugs that inhibit or inactivate acetylcholinesterase, either reversibly (for example, physostigmine) or irreversibly (for example, tetraethyl pyrophosphate).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anticholinesterase

(ăn′tē-kō′lə-nĕs′tə-rās′, -rāz′, ăn′tī-)
n.
A substance that inhibits the activity of a cholinesterase, especially acetylcholinesterase.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

anticholinesterase

Pharmacology An agent–eg, certain nerve gases, which blocks nerve impulses by inhibiting anticholinesterase Examples Insecticides–eg, parathion, and nerve gas agents–eg, sarin, soman, tabun; AChEs can be reversible or irreversible Action Eyes–hyperemia and pupillary constriction, GI tract—↑ GI contractions and secretion of gastric acid
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(AChE) (an'tē-kō-lin-es'tĕr-ās)
Any compound that inhibits or inactivates acetylcholinesterase, either reversibly (as e.g., physostigmine and other carbamates) or irreversibly (e.g., tetraethyl pyrophosphate and other organophosphorous compounds, including nerve agents).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anticholinesterase

Any substance opposing the action of the enzyme cholinesterase, which breaks down the NEUROTRANSMITTER acetylcholine, releasing the inactive choline for further synthesis to acetylcholine. An anticholinesterase agent thus potentiates the action of acetylcholine, a major neurotransmitter carrying nerve impulses across synapses and from nerves to muscles. Continued action causes serious effects. A number of organophosphorus insecticides and some nerve gases are anticholinesterases. Poisoning produces nausea, vomiting, sweating, salivation, restlessness, tightness of the chest, blurred vision, diarrhoea convulsions and death.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(an'tē-kō-lin-es'tĕr-ās)
A drug that inhibits or inactivates acetylcholinesterase, either reversibly (e.g., physostigmine) or irreversibly (e.g., tetraethyl pyrophosphate).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Eloff, "Anti-inflammatory, anticholinesterase and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts of twelve plants used traditionally to alleviate pain and inflammation in South Africa," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
Since an improvement in the cisatracurium-induced Fade would be the expected effect when the preparations were previously treated with ZM241385 (Oliveira et al., 2002; Pereira et al., 2012), it was supposed that the anticholinesterase activity of cisatracurium (Bornia et al., 2009; Bornia et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2011) in the experimental condition causing 100% Fade reduced the expression of facilitatory effect induced by the blockade of [A.sub.2A] receptors by producing a level of [M.sub.1]/[M.sub.2] activation by acetylcholine higher than that determined by the separate treatment of preparations with cisatracurium.
Several studies have demonstrated the anticancer and anticholinesterase potentials of these compounds (32-34).
Poisoning of wild birds from exposure to anticholinesterase coupounds and lead: diagnostic methods and selected cases.
The anticholinesterase effects of the compounds (4a-4s) were determined by modified Ellman's spectrophotometric method (Table 2).
Szwajgier, "Anticholinesterase activities of selected polyphenols--a short report," Polish Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences, vol.
cruzi (Chg) and treated with 30 mg/kg pyridostigmine bromide (Pyrido), an anticholinesterase agent, dissolved in tap water, for 30 days from the 5th to the 6th month of observation.
However, based on the continuous search for natural products that are cholinesterase inhibitors and also due to the fact that Cola acuminata is used in folk medicine for memory-improvement till date, it is therefore expedient to assess its anticholinesterase activity as well as effect on some prooxidant (FeS[O.sub.4], sodium nitroprusside, and quinolinic acid) induced oxidative stress in rats brain in vitro.
In recent controlled trials, administration of sage extracts, with known cholinergic characteristic improve behavioral and cognitive function in healthy young adults humans, and also improve memory and attention in healthy older volunteers by its anticholinesterase properties relevant to Alzheimer's disease therapy (Wake & al., 2000; SCHOLEY & al., 2008; LOIZZO & al., 2009).
Pathophysiological and clinical aspects of combat anticholinesterase poisoning.