antibiotic drugs


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antibiotic drugs

A very extensive range of drugs able to kill or prevent reproduction of bacteria in the body without killing the patient. Antibiotics were originally derived from cultures of living organisms, such as fungi or bacteria, but, today, many are chemically synthesized. The antibiotics have enormously extended the scope and effectiveness of medical therapy against bacterial infection, but have not succeeded in eliminating any bacterial diseases. The extensive, and not always judicious, use of antibiotics has led to widespread evolutionary changes in bacteria in response to their new environment, manifested by the acquisition, by natural selection, of resistance to these drugs. This forces researchers to produce ever new and more effective antibiotics. The antibiotics include such classes as the aminoglycosides, amphenicols, ansamycins, lincosamides, macrolides, polypeptides, tetracyclines and beta-lactams. The beta-lactams include groups such as carbapenems, cephalosporins, cephamycins, monobactams, oxacephems and penicillins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing use of antibiotic drugs to prevent this morbidity is anticipated to augment market demand over the forecast period.
The tenacity and adaptability of life guarantees that the world's arsenal of antibiotic drugs will be depleted one day.
It comes as the NHS urges health professionals to avoid overprescribing antibiotic drugs in a bid to stem growing resistance to them.
IDSA's 10 x '20 initiative, an ongoing call to action launched in 2010 to develop 10 new antibiotic drugs by 2020.
in healthcare settings; | monitoring and reducing super-fluous use of the drugs in farming; | quicker progress to be made on banning or restricting antibiotics that are vital for human health from being used in animals; | better use of diagnostic tools to help reduce unnecessary use of the drugs; | a global public awareness campaign about the problem of drug resistance; | increasing the supply of new antibiotic drugs.
Any use of antibiotics promotes the development and spread of superbugs -- multi-drug-resistant infections that evade the antimicrobial and antibiotic drugs designed to kill them.
If successful, this cheap, safe probiotic could improve quality of life and contain antibiotic resistance in this growing vulnerable population, helping to preserve the effectiveness of our available antibiotic drugs" The PS1.8m study is part of a larger investment of over PS15.8m into research to tackle drug resistant infections, by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) - the research arm of the NHS.
Perforation of the eardrum was much more common in the age before antibiotic drugs became widely available.
But the survey also shows that people are confused about how and when to use antibiotic drugs.
Teachers should also provide age appropriate lessons on when antibiotic drugs are required, says NICE.
Khartoum, 13 Sept (SUNA) - The Federal Ministry of Health has warned against the threats posed by the misuses of antibiotic drugs which it described as a time bomb, calling for urgent remedies for the random use of the drugs at a time the ministry has approved the new national policies on use of antibiotics.
"If we don't do it now then we'll have to rethink the whole basis of medicine because we've spent 60 years assuming that most infections will be cured by antibiotic drugs," he told a briefing in central London.