antagonism

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an·tag·o·nism

(an-tag'ŏ-nizm),
1. Denoting mutual opposition in action among structures, agents, diseases, or physiologic processes. Compare: synergism.
2. A situation in which the combined effect of two or more factors is smaller than the solitary effect of any one of the factors.
Synonym(s): mutual resistance
[G. antagōnisma, from anti, against, + agōnizomai, to fight, fr. agōn, a contest]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

antagonism

(ăn-tăg′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Biochemistry Interference in the physiological action of a chemical substance by another having a similar structure.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

antagonism

An interaction between chemicals or therapeutic agents, in which one substance partially or completely inhibits or counteracts the effect of the other.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·tag·o·nism

(an-tag'ŏ-nizm)
1. Denoting mutual opposition in action between structures, agents, diseases, or physiologic processes.
Compare: synergism
2. The situation in which the combined effect of two or more factors is smaller than the solitary effect of any one of the factors.
Synonym(s): mutual resistance.
[G. antagōnisma, from anti, against, + agōnizomai, to fight, fr. agōn, a contest]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

antagonism

  1. the inhibiting or nullifying action of one substance or organism on another, e.g. the antibiotic effect of penicillin, or the exhaustion of a food supply by one organism at the expense of another.
  2. the normal opposition between certain muscles (see ANTAGONISTIC MUSCLE).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005