antibacterial

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Related to antibacterial resistance: Antibiotic resistance

antibacterial

 [an″te-, an″ti-bak-tēr´e-al]
1. destroying or suppressing the growth or reproduction of bacteria.
2. an agent having such properties.

an·ti·bac·te·ri·al

(an'tē-bak-tēr'ē-ăl),
Destructive to or preventing the growth of bacteria.

antibacterial

(ăn′tē-băk-tîr′ē-əl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the growth of bacteria.
n.
An antibacterial substance.

an′ti·bac·te′ri·al n.

antibacterial

adjective Referring to an agent or effect that suppresses or inhibits bacterial reproduction noun A general term for any agent that suppresses bacterial growth or destroys bacteria

an·ti·bac·te·ri·al

(an'tē-bak-tēr'ē-ăl)
Destructive to or preventing the growth of bacteria.

antibacterial

Effective against bacteria.

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
We believe that it should be kept in reserve and used only for previously proven Pseudomonas strains or in life threatening infections with suspected antibacterial resistance. Its parenteral q8h administration makes it unsuitable for outpatient clinic administration.
Coli 06 (11.1) 05 (11.9) 1 (08.3) CONS 05 (09.2) 01 (02.3) 4 (33.3) Pseudomonas aeruginosa 03 (05.5) 02 (04.7) 1 (08.3) Acinetobacter species 02 (03.7) 02 (04.7) 0 (0) Citrobacter species 02 (03.7) 02 (04.7) 0 (0) Proteus mirabilis 02 (03.7) 01 (02.3) 1 (08.3) Proteus vulgaris 01 (01.8) 01 (02.3) 0 (0) Enterobacter species 01 (01.8) 01 (02.3) 0 (0) Enterococcus species 01 (01.8) 00 (0) 1 (08.3) Total 54 42 12 Table 2: Antibacterial resistance pattern of Gram positive bacteria Organisms P E CO V Cp S.
In terms of antibacterial resistance, the national response has gathered pace since the publication of a situational analysis in 2011 by the Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership-South Africa (GARP-SA).
Carigan and colleagues found that the incidence of post-biopsy sepsis increased from 0.71% in 2002-2003 to 2.15% in 2010-2011.[sup.1] There are other North American reports demonstrating a rising trend in post-TRUS biopsy complications.[sup.8] In a large Ontario-based study, Nam and colleagues found a 4-fold rise in hospital admission rates after TRUS-PB over a 10-year study period.[sup.2] American data reveal an increasing trend in post-biopsy infections from 0.4% to 1.1% between 1991 and 2007.[sup.3] In the context of rising antibacterial resistance, it is not surprising to notice an increased incidence of post-biopsy infections at our institution.
It has been established that the antibacterial resistance is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality.
The antibacterial resistance was explained in terms of percentage and recorded in tabular form, while to estimate the comparison between resistance patterns from one year to another the Chi-square test was performed with degree of freedom (df) of one with the help of Graph pad prism version 5.01 software.
Virulence factors and antibacterial resistance profile of Vibrio strains isolated from shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) hemolymph.
The antibacterial effect can last for a long time and can be less prone to producing antibacterial resistance [20, 21].
Also, when AHP[R] comes into contact with germs it releases free-radicals which act nonspecifically on multiple cell targets to kill germs in such a manner that prevents antibacterial resistance".
The triclosan assessment cites European and Australian studies that show no clear link between products containing triclosan and increased antibacterial resistance.
It has, therefore, been speculated that the improper use of biocides may have an insidious effect, contributing to the evolution and persistence of pathogens within microbial communities and might lead to the selection of antibacterial resistance. An important component of Pakistani spices mixes is garlic.
To successfully tackle antibacterial resistance, screening for novel targets and developing new strategies to interfere with bacteria are just as important as other challenges, including predicting toxicology, selectivity, resistance, permeability and pk of a new lead, and creating new models for optimization of leads and compounds.