antibacterial


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Related to antibacterial: antibacterial drugs

antibacterial

 [an″te-, an″ti-bak-tēr´e-al]
1. destroying or suppressing the growth or reproduction of bacteria.
2. an agent having such properties.

an·ti·bac·te·ri·al

(an'tē-bak-tēr'ē-ăl),
Destructive to or preventing the growth of bacteria.

antibacterial

(ăn′tē-băk-tîr′ē-əl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the growth of bacteria.
n.
An antibacterial substance.

an′ti·bac·te′ri·al n.

antibacterial

adjective Referring to an agent or effect that suppresses or inhibits bacterial reproduction noun A general term for any agent that suppresses bacterial growth or destroys bacteria

an·ti·bac·te·ri·al

(an'tē-bak-tēr'ē-ăl)
Destructive to or preventing the growth of bacteria.

antibacterial

Effective against bacteria.

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The major factors that drive the global antibacterial coatings market for medical implants are increase in incidence of implant-associated infections, demand for implantable devices, rise in bone related and cardiovascular disorders, and growth of geriatric population.
Overall, 80.3% of infants received >1 prescription for an antibacterial drug during the follow-up period.
The antibacterial activity test was performed using agar diffusion method with perforation technique.
To objectively measure the potential antibacterial efficacy of antibacterial fabrics against a S.
After electroless deposition, the copper nanoparticle coatings bridged by surface grafted polymer brushes were obtained on the cotton or polyester substrates, expecting the remarkable antibacterial abilities.
All water extracts were inactive except of Brassica compastris (Sarson) which exhibited antibacterial activity against both the organisms.
A numbers of heterocyclic scaffolds have antibacterial activity [17-27].
Nonetheless, the American Cleaning Institute has laid out a detailed work plan on additional safety and efficacy data for the three major ingredients used in consumer antibacterial soaps that aligns with FDA's requests.
The FDA initially proposed the ban in 2013 in response to growing evidence that the antibacterial chemicals used in everyday products, including laundry detergents, deodorant and children's toys, could pose health risks.
"The FDA already has in its hands data that shows the safety and effectiveness of antibacterial soaps," ACI said in a September 2 statement.
FDA has given manufacturers of antibacterial products a year to take the banned substances out of their products, or remove the products entirely from the market.
"Companies will no longer be able to market antibacterial washes with these ingredients because manufacturers did not demonstrate that the ingredients are both safe for long-term daily use and more effective than plain soap and water in preventing illness and the spread of certain infections," the FDA wrote in a statement.