antiadrenergic


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Related to antiadrenergic: anticholinergic

sympatholytic

 [sim″pah-tho-lit´ik]
1. blocking transmission of impulses from the adrenergic (sympathetic) postganglionic fibers to effector organs or tissues, inhibiting such sympathetic functions as smooth muscle contraction and glandular secretion.
2. an agent that produces such an effect; called also antiadrenergic.

an·ti·ad·ren·er·gic

(an'tē-ad-rĕ-ner'jik),
Antagonistic to the action of sympathetic or other adrenergic nerve fibers.
See also: sympatholytic.

antiadrenergic

/an·ti·ad·re·ner·gic/ (-ad″rĕ-ner´jik)
1. sympatholytic; opposing the effects of impulses conveyed by adrenergic postganglionic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system.
2. an agent that so acts.

antiadrenergic

[an′ti·ad′rənur′jik, an′tī-]
Etymology: Gk, anti + L, ad + ren, to kidney
1 pertaining to the blockage of the effects of impulses transmitted by the adrenergic postganglionic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system.
2 an antiadrenergic agent. These drugs block the response to norepinephrine bound to alpha receptors and reduce the tonus of smooth muscle in peripheral blood vessels, causing increased peripheral circulation and decreased blood pressure. Alpha1-blocking agents include ergotamine derivatives, phenoxybenzamine, phentolamine, and tolazoline hydrochloride; they are used to treat conditions such as migraines, Raynaud's disease, pheochromocytoma, diabetic gangrene, and spastic vascular disease. Beta1-blocking agents decrease the rate and force of heart contractions and are administered for hypertension, angina, and arrhythmias; propranolol hydrochloride and its congeners are examples. Also called sympatholytic. Compare adrenergic, anticholinergic.

an·ti·ad·ren·er·gic

(an'tē-ad-rĕ-nĕr'jik)
Antagonistic to the action of sympathetic or other adrenergic nerve fibers.
See also: sympatholytic

antiadrenergic

agent antagonizing the effects of sympathetic nervous system activity

antiadrenergic

1. sympatholytic: opposing the effects of impulses conveyed by adrenergic postganglionic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system.
2. an antiadrenergic agent.

antiadrenergic drugs
include adrenergic blocking agents, both alpha- and beta-blockers, and adrenergic neuron-blocking drugs and catecholamine depleting agents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antiadrenergic and fentanyl antidopaminergic effects; analgesia w/fentanyl Drug Dosage Benzodiazepines Diazepam Oral: 2, 5, or 10 mg bid to qid; Slow IV: 5 to 10 mg q4h Lorazepam Oral: 1 to 2 mg tid; IM/slow IV: 2 mg Clonazepam Oral: 0.
For example, central antiadrenergic agents and most diuretic medications may cause erectile disorder, so switching to another medication within the same class may not alleviate the symptom.
The central and peripheral antiadrenergic action of chronic melatonin treatment might eliminate the mechanisms counter-regulating decreased blood pressure, providing thus additional cardioprotective mechanism.
They can be grouped into eight different classifications: (1) alpha/beta-adrenergic blocking agents, (2) angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, (3) angiotensin II receptor antagonists, (4) antiadrenergic agents, (5) beta-adrenergic blocking agents, (6) calcium-channel blocking agents, (7) diuretics, and (8) vasodilators.
Peripherally acting antiadrenergic agents, like reserpine, are rarely used in pregnancy, so experience is limited and there are better-tolerated agents.
At least two classes of drugs--anticonvulsants and antiadrenergic agents--are currently under investigation in this population and seem to show some promise.
He noted that although antiadrenergic agents are only now being tested systematically, the possible utility of agents that modify excessive adrenergic activity in PTSD has been recognized for decades.
Friedman has used antiadrenergic agents with some success in patients exhibiting significant arousal and hyperreactivity or dissociation.
Theoretically, anticholinergics and antiadrenergics which have high dose antipsychotics (such as phenothiazine) should be foreseen that they might form a risk factor in terms of angle closure glaucoma (ACG) Actually, when antipsychotics are compared with the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), they relatively have less effects on ocular smooth muscles and risk of producing ACG is far less in proportion to TCA.