antiadrenergic


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Related to antiadrenergic: anticholinergic

sympatholytic

 [sim″pah-tho-lit´ik]
1. blocking transmission of impulses from the adrenergic (sympathetic) postganglionic fibers to effector organs or tissues, inhibiting such sympathetic functions as smooth muscle contraction and glandular secretion.
2. an agent that produces such an effect; called also antiadrenergic.

an·ti·ad·ren·er·gic

(an'tē-ad-rĕ-ner'jik),
Antagonistic to the action of sympathetic or other adrenergic nerve fibers.
See also: sympatholytic.

an·ti·ad·ren·er·gic

(an'tē-ad-rĕ-nĕr'jik)
Antagonistic to the action of sympathetic or other adrenergic nerve fibers.
See also: sympatholytic
References in periodicals archive ?
Theoretically, anticholinergics and antiadrenergics which have high-dose antipsychotics (such as phenothiazine) should be foreseen that they might form a risk factor in terms of angle-closure glaucoma (ACG).
* Pheochromocytoma: The rational for the use of magnesium sulphate infusion in the anaesthetic management of pheochromocytoma is its antiadrenergic, antihypertensive & antiarrhythmic action.
(4.) Maslova L, Kondrat'ev B, Maslov L, Lishmanov I.The cardioprotective and antiadrenergic activity of an extract of Rhodiola rosea in stress.[In Russian.] Eksp Klin Farmakol.1994; 57:61-63.
The antiadrenergic agent prazosin is gaining increasing use in PTSD on the strength of several positive studies, including one that showed efficacy comparable to that of quetiapine but with far fewer side effects.
Although some evidence exists to support the use of other antiadrenergic agents such as clonidine and guanfacine as well as the anticonvulsant gabapentin in PTSD, "'large, randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the role" of all of these agents, Dr.
Droperidol has antiadrenergic and antidopaminergic effects.
"The cardioprotective and antiadrenergic activity of an extract of Rhodiola rosea in stress," IuB Eksp Klin Farmakol, November-December 1994.
On the other hand, false-negative (FN) results could be found in patients on antihypertensive treatment with antiadrenergic agents or ACE inhibitors, which both reduce CNH concentrations.
Peripherally acting antiadrenergic agents, like reserpine, are rarely used in pregnancy so experience is limited and there are better-tolerated agents.
For example, diuretics (such as chlorthalidone, hydrochlorothiazide, and spironolactone),[15,18] central antiadrenergic agents (eg, clonidine, methyldopa, reserpine),[19,22] and guanethidine[23] are commonly cited as causing erectile disorder.
Antiadrenergic medications such as clonidine have decreased or exacerbated diaphoresis in studies.