anti-VEGF drugs


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anti-VEGF drugs 

Drugs which bind to VEGF receptors without causing activation, thus blocking the production of new blood vessels and enhanced vessel permeability by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). They are used in the treatment of some forms of cancer (administered intravenously), and injected intravitreally in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization, retinal venous occlusion, and macular oedema. Examples: bevacizumab, pegaptanib sodium, ranibizumab. Syn. angiogenesis inhibitors. See age-related macular degeneration; diabetic retinopathy; VEGF.
References in periodicals archive ?
We attempted to assess if the 3 anti-VEGF drugs caused cytotoxic effects at the end of 72 hours.
Anti-VEGF drugs, 5-FU, triamcinolone, and amphotericin B have been observed to clear out more rapidly in patients who have undergone PPV; thus, the effective duration has been reported to be shorter than expected [11-15].
Presently, NICE criteria for the use of anti-VEGF drugs in the treatment of nAMD requires that the patient has signs of active disease, no permanent damage to the fovea, a lesion no larger than 12 times the optic disc area and visual acuity between 6/12 and 6/96.
After induction, intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs were administered immediately in the ranibizumab group ( n = 30; ranibizumab 3 [micro]l, 10 mg/ml, Novartis Co.), conbercept group ( n = 30; conbercept 3 [micro]l, 10 mg/ml, Chengdu Kanghong Biotechnologies Co.
Getting around through the maze of Anti-VEGF Drugs — Dr Udayan Dixit
Anti-VEGF drugs as the 2009 first-line therapy for choroidal neovascularization in pathologic myopia.
Further large scale studies are required to determine the efficacy of PDT and anti-VEGF drugs in the treatment of choroidal osteoma related CNV.
The small number of relevant trials and variation in their characteristics limit comparisons between different anti-VEGF drugs. A relevant ongoing study conducted by the DRCR.net, the protocol T, proposes as its primary objective to compare the efficacy and safety of intravitreal aflibercept, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab when used to treat central-involved DME.
"While everyone was working on anti-angiogenesis, I was scratching my head saying, 'It's not going to help.'" Instead, in 2001, Jain proposed doing the opposite: increasing a tumor's blood supply and repairing leaky blood vessels with anti-VEGF drugs used in judicious doses.
Injection related complications have been reported following intravitreal use of anti-VEGF drugs, but no drug - related ocular toxic effect has been reported.
Its off-label use has been controversial mainly because two other anti-VEGF drugs are on the market, but at very much higher prices that would put them out of reach of poorer patients.
Only those patients who had already gone blind in one eye would be eligible for anti-VEGF drugs Macugen and Lucentis.