anti-discrimination policy

(redirected from anti discrimination policy)

anti-discrimination policy

A UK management policy and part of the framework for organisational good practice, which is designed to prevent discrimination against individuals on the basis of differences—e.g., age, class, cognitive ability, culture, gender, health status, HIV status, marital status, mental health, physical ability, place of origin, political beliefs, race, religion, sensory ability, and sexuality.
References in classic literature ?
Lord Ingram, like his sisters, is very tall; like them, also, he is handsome; but he shares Mary's apathetic and listless look: he seems to have more length of limb than vivacity of blood or vigour of brain.
He, like his rag-weed, had settled down to an apathetic jog.
Edgar, after he had turned his eyes on Mimi, resumed his apathetic position and sullen silence.
Flack's intentions, and might have bought the plot before building commenced: but he was apathetic and dilatory.
While they uncovered the sheaves he stood apathetic beside his portable repository of force, round whose hot blackness the morning air quivered.
A few apathetic faces of judges alone could be dimly discerned.
Look," said the girl dully, indicating the horizon with an apathetic gesture.
Nevertheless, she mistook the quietude of the political thinker and the preoccupation of the intrepid worker for the apathetic torpor of an official broken down by the dulness of routine, vanquished by that most hateful of all miseries, the mediocrity that simply earns a living; and she groaned at being married to a man without energy.
I lay back against Ernest in the automobile, and with apathetic eyes watched the soldiers trying to get the machine out of the city.
The hope of inheriting eternal bliss helps the relations of these unhappy creatures and all others round about them to exert on a large scale, and with sublime devotion, a mother's ceaseless protecting care over an apathetic creature who does not understand it in the first instance, and who in a little while forgets it all.
But the night was long and dark: the snow heavily clogged the wheels and balled the horses' feet; the animals were consumedly lazy; the coachman most execrably cautious; the passengers confoundedly apathetic in their supine indifference to the rate of our progression.
Thaka and Numgo and Gunto, disturbed by the growlings of the two young bulls, looked up half apathetic, half interested.