anthropophagous


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anthropophagous

Man-eating. Cannibal.
References in periodicals archive ?
dirus was likely to behave both exophagy and endophagy, but significantly, it was a exophilic anthropophagous feeder [21].
In short, with whatever ethical consequences, I am arguing that the monstrous plant, at least in the familiar anthropophagous form that has come down to us, often remains a specifically Darwinian monster, and it is no coincidence that we find the great blossoming of fictional fleurs du mal in the late 19th century and early 20th century.
On the one hand, Verne is very negative towards Maori in Among the Cannibals, regarding them as anthropophagous savages, as will be explored more fully later in this discussion.
In the present study, I will demonstrate that the motif of the anthropophagous tropical wilderness began to take form less than a century after Columbus' arrival in the New World.
Svich engages the myth of Iphigenia through the eyes of the earlier writers she mentions in order to do exactly what Santiago identifies in Latin American literary texts as a cannibalistic (anthropophagous) ceremony: "Somewhere between sacrifice and playfulness, prison and transgression, submission to the code and aggression, obedience and rebellion, assimilation and expression --there, in this apparently empty space, its temple and its clandestinity, is where the anthropophagous ritual of Latin American discourse is constructed" (Santiago 38).
Anthropophagous culinary delights were enjoyed, Dahmerlike, by Albert Fisher, the Mad Bogeyman of Wisteria Cottage, White Plains, N.Y.
William James's expedition on the Amazon river, Mark Twain's voyages to Bermuda, and Ilya Kabakov's sojourns in space are revealed in Peter Skinner's Almost Missed, "Travels Terrestrial and Cosmic." Peter notes James's anthropophagous fish, Twain's bewildering green, and Kabakov's flights of fortitude.
(11) Neil Larsen also revisits the metaphor of cannibalism in his paradigm of Latin American oppositional culture, which is divided into the 'Transcultural' and the 'Anthropophagous'.
The Old Woman is anthropophagous of young children according to tales where she comes at the night time, and steals children.
She was not alone; the Rough Guide to Bolivia advises that "though the lurid tales you may hear of anthropophagous Aymaras should be ignored, this is not a place to linger long if you're an outsider." We drove to Achacachi anyway.