anthropomorphism

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anthropomorphism

 [an″thro-po-mor´fizm]
the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman beings and objects.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrō-pō-mōr'fizm),
Ascription of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects. Compare: theriomorphism.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrŏ-pō-mōr'fizm)
Assignment of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

anthropomorphism

Attributing human characteristics to the diety, to inanimate objects, animals, or phenomena. Because of our experiential limitations and need to find explantions, however unsatisfactory, we commonly resorts to an anthropomorphic concept of anything transcendental.

anthropomorphism

the attribution of human characteristics to animals other than man.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The doctrine smacks of both metaphysics and anthropomorphizing, which he elsewhere derides.
There is always the danger of anthropomorphizing the birds, but it's possible that Wendell has picked Cass precisely because he's so strong.
(Evidently the anthropomorphizing of texts continues apace: "authors" lie stiffening in the postmodern morgue while texts enjoy some get-up-and-go, even if, on page 1, a utopia is also "enmeshed in a web of historical contingencies to which it cannot but draw attention even as it struggles to escape.") Hoping to focus on the (unspecified) "models for historical transformation engaged and revised" by these utopias, Leslie says she will analyze "the history and politics of reading utopia" and trace "utopia's shifting location in the historical imagination." Too tall an order, probably, for so short a book: the "contingencies" are only minimally sketched in and this "historical imagination" barely traced.
Fantastic detail goes into describing just how raking sounds, almost anthropomorphizing the tool.
Even so, anthropomorphizing devices thrive into our own century, and Guthrie amply illustrates them from Joyce, Eliot, Plath, and others.
Since there is a long history of anthropomorphizing animals, going back to at least Aesop and his fables, scientists tend to be very chary about imputing ethical or any other unselfish motives to animal behavior.