anthropomorphism

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anthropomorphism

 [an″thro-po-mor´fizm]
the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman beings and objects.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrō-pō-mōr'fizm),
Ascription of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects. Compare: theriomorphism.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrŏ-pō-mōr'fizm)
Assignment of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

anthropomorphism

Attributing human characteristics to the diety, to inanimate objects, animals, or phenomena. Because of our experiential limitations and need to find explantions, however unsatisfactory, we commonly resorts to an anthropomorphic concept of anything transcendental.

anthropomorphism

the attribution of human characteristics to animals other than man.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By downplaying the power of extrahuman contextual factors over the human, the molecular gaze can be said to anthropomorphize agency.
93), anthropomorphize animals as able to think and understand language.
"We show that participants with low power were more likely to anthropomorphize the slot machine after losing the game, whereas those with high power were more likely to anthropomorphize after winning the game," the authors conclude.
The related tendency to anthropomorphize, or assign human characteristics to nonhuman things or events, often accompanies animism, he adds.
Although we like to anthropomorphize, we do not assign human qualities to each and every single object we encounter.
From the beginning of her life as an egg, to her constant struggle to evade predators, the discovery of her first shell, the need to find larger shells as she grows bigger, to her eventual motherhood, Hermit Crab's Home stays faithful to nature in both story and illustration, eschewing the impulse to overly anthropomorphize wild creatures.
The smoke-and-mirrors cues are efficient enough to anthropomorphize some natural feature in almost every picture--a fallen branch like a stick-figure goblin in the right-hand foreground of Lost and Found #2, 2005, the Hulk-like butt of a fallen tree covered in pine needles and moss in Lost and Found #6, 2005--that would then stand in for the missing human figures we'd see in a Gregory Crewdson or a Caspar David Friedrich.
The tendency to anthropomorphize, to think in terms of characters and stories, puts one in mind of issues of group behavior like inclusion and exclusion, togetherness and alienation, or dominance and submission.
Wilmarth's tendency to anthropomorphize architecture is evident in one of the earliest works in the show, Platform Dream #5, 1963.