anthropomorphism

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anthropomorphism

 [an″thro-po-mor´fizm]
the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman beings and objects.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrō-pō-mōr'fizm),
Ascription of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects. Compare: theriomorphism.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrŏ-pō-mōr'fizm)
Assignment of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anthropomorphism

Attributing human characteristics to the diety, to inanimate objects, animals, or phenomena. Because of our experiential limitations and need to find explantions, however unsatisfactory, we commonly resorts to an anthropomorphic concept of anything transcendental.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

anthropomorphism

the attribution of human characteristics to animals other than man.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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In Byron's vision Southey stands--and falls, into the Lake of the Lake Poets--as the quintessential example of anthropomorphists who presume to judge and who, in doing so, disregard the Vision of Judgment's central and largely silent biblical subtext alluded to in stanza 101: "And thinkest thou this, O Man, that judgest them which do such things, and doest the same, that thou shalt escape the judgment of God?" (Romans 2:3)
(76) We have elsewhere demonstrated that Ibn Hanbal quite unequivocally was an anthropomorphist in the strict sense: he was adamant about God's anthropoid form.
There is no way one could translate mushabbih here as "anthropomorphist." As Daniel Gimaret points out, "ce qui caracterise les gahmiyya, c'est fondamentalement ...
150/767), probably Islam's most notorious anthropomorphist, who claimed that God is a body in the form of a man, with flesh, blood, hair, and bones.
Rose, for instance, describes Country as personal pronoun, verb and noun, evoking an interrelatedness that extends beyond anthropomorphist conceptions of objective knowledge regarding the land.