anthropometry


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anthropometry

 [an″thro-pom´ĕ-tre]
the science that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human body. adj., adj anthropomet´ric.

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrō-pom'ĕ-trē),
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry

/an·thro·pom·e·try/ (an″thro-pom´ĕ-tre) the science dealing with measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human body.anthropomet´ric

anthropometry

[an′thrəpom′ətrē]
Etymology: Gk, anthropos + metron, measure
the science of measuring the human body as to height, weight, and size of component parts, including skinfold thickness, to study and compare the relative proportions under normal and abnormal conditions. Also called anthropometric measurement. anthropometric, adj.

anthropometry

The study of objective measurable physical variables in humans, which impacts on architecture, industrial design and ergonomics.

anthropometry

Medtalk
1. The measurement of a person's physical parameters–height and weight.
2. The field that deals with the physical dimensions, proportions, and composition of the human body, as well as the study of related variables that affect them.

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrŏ-pom'ĕ-trē)
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry

Human body measurement and weighing for scientific purposes such as anthropological or nutritional research or as an aid to clinical assessment.

Bertillon,

Alphonse, chief of criminal investigation for Paris police, 1853-1914.
Bertillon system - identification system. Synonym(s): anthropometry
Bertillon cephalometer

anthropometry

physical measurements of human size, shape, proportion and body composition for the purposes of comparison and establishing population norms, e.g. for gender, age, weight, ethnicity/race.

anthropometry

comparative measurement of physiological parameters

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrŏ-pom'ĕ-trē)
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry (an´thrəpom´ətrē),

n the measurement of the body and its parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
93, respectively) by variables related to training and anthropometry (Equation 1), physiology (Equation 2), biomechanics (Equation 3) and a combination of them (Equation 4), respectively.
In this research, the injury mechanisms of driver spine fractures, driver anthropometry and the effects of changing the parameters are discussed.
Application of digital anthropometry for craniofacial assessment.
Comparing DEXA and anthropometry with computerized tomography (CT) in assessment of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), Mickles-field et al.
Anthropometry in forensic medicine and forensic science--'Forensic Anthropometry'.
The field methods include ultrasound, anthropometry, SF measurement and BIA which are usually normalized and confirmed by standard laboratory methods [6-8].
Anthropometry is a study of human body measurements such as stature, reach, body length, circumference and many others.
Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to determine whether there were any significant differences in anthropometry, dietary intake and haematological variables among the four levels.
A joint ASTM/WEAR Conference on Anthropometry and Fit will be held June 24-25, 2014, at the Sheraton Toronto in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4) The word anthropometry is derived from the Greek words anthropos, meaning "man" or "human being" and metron, meaning "measure.
The course will define ergonomics and its three components--work physiology, anthropometry and musculoskeletal disorders--and common risk factors such as vibration and temperature.
The efforts extend from the Civil War, when teams of researchers were sent to Union Army camps to gather information from thousands of Soldiers on anthropometry, lifting strength, pulmonary function, and other physiological factors.