anthropometry

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anthropometry

 [an″thro-pom´ĕ-tre]
the science that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human body. adj., adj anthropomet´ric.

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrō-pom'ĕ-trē),
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry

The study of objective measurable physical variables in humans, which impacts on architecture, industrial design and ergonomics.

anthropometry

Medtalk
1. The measurement of a person's physical parameters–height and weight.
2. The field that deals with the physical dimensions, proportions, and composition of the human body, as well as the study of related variables that affect them.

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrŏ-pom'ĕ-trē)
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry

Human body measurement and weighing for scientific purposes such as anthropological or nutritional research or as an aid to clinical assessment.

Bertillon,

Alphonse, chief of criminal investigation for Paris police, 1853-1914.
Bertillon system - identification system. Synonym(s): anthropometry
Bertillon cephalometer

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrŏ-pom'ĕ-trē)
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]
References in periodicals archive ?
All the fieldworkers were accredited Level 1 International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) anthropometrists.
After the interview, participants were assessed by anthropometrists who checked their weight, height and waist (circumference).
Facilitators and anthropometrists were students majoring on Human Nutrition and Psychology from the same university who received anthropometric training and standardization prior to field work.
Perhaps by joining talents, physical anthropometrists and medicine and surgical clinicians will advance the field and improve patient care.[8] This study demonstrates that Cephalic index is determined by genetic and racial factors.
Galton deserves recognition as one of the first investigative anthropometrists. He was a scientist producing some of the first weather maps for recording changes in barometric pressure [28] and strategies for categorizing fingerprints [29].
Before performing the motor task, anthropometric data was measured, according to the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) standardized measurement protocol [6] by ISAK certified anthropometrists, with exception of the abdominal girth [7].
It is, perhaps, ironic that the extraordinarily detailed statistics gathered by Charles Roberts and his contemporaries, and the `laws of growth' that allowed British and American anthropometrists to fix children, for the first time, into their place in relation to an average height for their age and class, (32) also encouraged the scientific interest in the processes of development.