anthropometry

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anthropometry

 [an″thro-pom´ĕ-tre]
the science that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human body. adj., adj anthropomet´ric.

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrō-pom'ĕ-trē),
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry

/an·thro·pom·e·try/ (an″thro-pom´ĕ-tre) the science dealing with measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human body.anthropomet´ric

anthropometry

[an′thrəpom′ətrē]
Etymology: Gk, anthropos + metron, measure
the science of measuring the human body as to height, weight, and size of component parts, including skinfold thickness, to study and compare the relative proportions under normal and abnormal conditions. Also called anthropometric measurement. anthropometric, adj.

anthropometry

The study of objective measurable physical variables in humans, which impacts on architecture, industrial design and ergonomics.

anthropometry

Medtalk
1. The measurement of a person's physical parameters–height and weight.
2. The field that deals with the physical dimensions, proportions, and composition of the human body, as well as the study of related variables that affect them.

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrŏ-pom'ĕ-trē)
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry

Human body measurement and weighing for scientific purposes such as anthropological or nutritional research or as an aid to clinical assessment.

Bertillon,

Alphonse, chief of criminal investigation for Paris police, 1853-1914.
Bertillon system - identification system. Synonym(s): anthropometry
Bertillon cephalometer

anthropometry

physical measurements of human size, shape, proportion and body composition for the purposes of comparison and establishing population norms, e.g. for gender, age, weight, ethnicity/race.

anthropometry

comparative measurement of physiological parameters

an·thro·pom·e·try

(an'thrŏ-pom'ĕ-trē)
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body.
[anthropo- + G. metron, measure]

anthropometry (an´thrəpom´ətrē),

n the measurement of the body and its parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on anthropometrical and mechanical requirements, different design solutions were analyzed.
2012) Comparing manually measured anthropometrical points of human faces with fully computerized ones.
Demographic and anthropometrical characteristics of the elderly ([greater than or equal to] 65years) and the younger (20-40 years old) populations (n=552) [greater than or 20-40 years equal to] 65 years (n=301) (n=251) Demographic features Age (years) 35 (29-39) 67 (65-70) Height (cm) 155.
6) Anthropometrical measurements and blood pressure was taken three times seated, in intervals of 20 minutes (results were then averaged).
The anthropometrical aspect of the state census was intended to be guided by Topinard's method and technologies, as Risley's private correspondence with Topinard testifies.
9) A Manual of Anthropometry; or A Guide to the Physical Examination and Measurements of the Human Body: Containing a Systematic Table of Measurements, an Anthropometrical Chart or Register, and Instructions for Making Measurements on a Uniform Plan (London: Churchill, 1878), p.
2005) The influence of anthropometrical and flexibility parameters on the results of breaststroke swimming.
The questionnaire was structured in 2 parts: the first with demographical, anthropometrical and weight perception/importance questions; the second evaluating the SOC score.
The anthropological methods can be divided into two groups: the anthropometrical and the somatoscopical.
Relationships of anthropometrical parameters and body composition with bone mineral content or density in young women with different levels of physical activity.
Indeed, who better than Eurocopter to provide the skeleton and anthropometrical data that will result in a simulator system expected to perfectly mimic its own real helicopters, or Thales (merging the talents from both former Thomson and Dassault Electronique) bringing the skills to "polygonate" a realistic bit-generated environment and Defence Conseil International with the diplomatic and financial pull to crystallize many a foreign military helicopter pilot training project into a viable package?
Prediction of alpine ski performance based upon selected anthropometrical and motor dexterity parameters.