anthropocentric

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anthropocentric

 [an″thro-po-sen´trik]
with a human bias; considering humans the center of the universe.

an·thro·po·cen·tric

(an'thrō-pō-sen'trik),
1. Assessing the universe from the perspective of humans, their values, their experiences.
2. Assuming humans at center of reason for the universe.
[anthropo- + G. kentron, center]

anthropocentric

/an·thro·po·cen·tric/ (an″thro-po-sen´trik) with a human bias; considering humans the center of the universe.

an·thro·po·cen·tric

(an'thrŏ-pō-sen'trik)
With a human bias, under the assumption that humankind is the central fact of the universe.
[anthropo- + G. kentron, center]

anthropocentric

with a human bias; considering humans to be the center of the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anthropocentrism can be traced back to much of early theological and Christian thinking, such as the work of Saint Thomas Aquinas (Ryder, 1983)[1].
In contrast, Snyder's construction of the political visionary does not directly confront the problems of language, projection, and anthropocentrism.
This sort of religious-centred anthropocentrism is rarer nowadays, yet it still resurfaces from time to time.
Undoubtedly, their valuable critique of anthropocentrism succeeds in reorienting political values around zoe's communal preservation.
Such methodological anthropocentrism opens up a broad-based meeting ground upon which many people, Catholics as well as persons of other confessions, religions, and worldviews, can comfortably come together.
Similarly, anthropocentrism is the wrong name for the right kind of target, says Hayward.
Among the similarities are a concern for sustainability and growth beyond pure anthropocentrism.
What Defaux stabilizes in a Christian allegory in fact betrays a greater ambivalence about the dubious consequences of anthropocentrism.
Charles Jencks has crystallised much of this cultural climate in explaining a new affection for Peter Eisenman's work, which Jencks believes, 'in an era when opinion and anthropocentrism dominate culture, returns us to a nonhuman standard for architecture that used to be the preserve of religions'.
Second there is a growing unease with what might be called anthropocentrism, where that is construed as the view that everything that has a value gets it derivatively from human beings.
In Dulles's view, the only authentic humanism is one that links anthropocentrism with theocentrism and provides a transcendental foundation for human dignity.
Rejecting anthropocentrism and the stewardship model of environmental ethics, Manes sees the biocentric epistemology informing the activism of Earth First