anthropic principle


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anthropic principle

A utilitarian principle that the laws of physics are intended to allow existence of life in the universe or, put differently, the philosophical consideration that observations of the physical universe must be compatible with the conscious life that observes it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anthropic principle allows for consideration of scientific explanations of creation, such as the big-bang theory, which asserts that the universe expanded to its current state through an explosion that shattered an infinite density of matter and space.
And once again, the conditions captured in the anthropic principle make it this way.
The latest, now-foolish argument for the existence of God is the Anthropic Principle: the idea that the physical laws of our universe had to be so precise to create the possibility of life, that God must have created the universe especially for us.
Additionally, the increasing clarity of the continuity between cosmogenesis, biogenesis, and ontogenesis seemingly authorizes a stronger interpretation of the anthropic principle. (22) While on one hand, it appears more and more obvious that we have access to reality as it is to us--which would therefore assert that our knowledge is relative to our perspective of things, perspectivism, or pragmatic instrumentalism--on the other hand, the knowledge we have appears less and less to be the fruit of chance; in a certain way, in the frame of an anthropic interpretation, it would be co-natural to the natural world.
Given that physics is typically regarded as a science as 'hard' as anything in cognitive brain science, more peculiar than that gap between quantum and relativity models is a notion called the "anthropic principle" that puts "man" back into the center of things.
The anthropic principle is often used as a religious argument for special creation with reasoning like this, "The reason our universe is so peculiar and well-fitted to life is because the Creator wanted (willed) it to be that way for the formation of life." Dr.
12 National Catholic Reporter, particularly the articles on the cosmos and the Anthropic Principle. It reminded me of the time a few years ago when in a flight of fancy I imagined mankind in the center of the universe just like the ancients used to believe.
(10) The ongoing controversy over the so-called anthropic principle is a case in point.
Lately, however, the issue arose again in the form of the anthropic principle, which concentrates on the origins of life.
Numerous versions of the anthropic principle have been proposed.
He ends by reminding us that we may never answer questions like "Why is there something rather than nothing?" Present science can do no better than to create the "anthropic principle," which merely says that if there were nothing, we would not be around to contemplate it.
Echoing the anthropic principle, he notes that the physical universe can never be known independently of human measurements and choices of what to measure.