anthracosis


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Related to anthracosis: asbestosis, silicosis

anthracosis

 [an″thrah-ko´sis]
a type of coal workers' pneumoconiosis due to inhalation of coal dust not containing silica.

an·thra·co·sis

(an'thră-kō'sis),
Pneumonoconiosis from accumulation of carbon from inhaled smoke or coal dust in the lungs.
See also: pneumomelanosis.
Synonym(s): collier lung, miner's lung (1)
[anthraco- + G. -osis, condition]

anthracosis

/an·thra·co·sis/ (an″thrah-ko´sis) pneumoconiosis, usually asymptomatic, due to deposition of anthracite coal dust in the lungs.

anthracosis

(ăn′thrə-kō′sĭs)

anthracosis

[an′thrəkō′sis/]
Etymology: Gk, anthrax, coal, osis, condition
a chronic lung disease characterized by the deposit of coal dust in the lungs and by the formation of black nodules on the bronchioles, resulting in focal emphysema. The condition occurs in coal miners and is aggravated by cigarette smoking. There is no specific treatment; most cases are asymptomatic, and preventing further exposure to coal dust may halt progress of the condition. Also called black lung disease, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, miner's pneumoconiosis. See also inorganic dust.

anthracosis

(1) Coal workers’ pneumoconiosis.  
(2) A generic term for any blackening of tissues, especially of the lungs.

anthracosis

Pulmonology A generic term for blackening of tissues, often understood to mean carbon dust deposition in the lung and lymph nodes, which does not itself cause disease, and is usually present in urban dwellers, and in those working in certain occupations–eg, coal mining. See coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

an·thra·co·sis

(an'thră-kō'sis)
Pneumonoconiosis from accumulation of carbon from inhaled smoke or coal dust in the lungs.
Synonym(s): collier's lung, melanedema, miner's lung (1) .
[anthraco- + G. -osis, condition]

anthracosis

A chronic lung disease resulting from repeated inhalation of coal dust. Inflammation of the lungs with extensive fibrous tissue formation leads to a reduction in lung function and sometimes severe disability.

anthracosis

heavy black deposits of carbon; a common necropsy finding in dogs which have passed a busy working life in a heavily industrialized city.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bronchial anthracosis was significantly more common in women (p = .
According to this study, exposure to TB was two-fold higher in people with bronchial anthracosis compared with normal cases.
Since the number of people in contact with tuberculosis was higher in the bronchial anthracosis group, tentatively, eliminating those with a history of contact with TB led to a reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis in the bronchial anthracosis group from 16.
Anthracosis is mostly seen in coal miners due to accumulation of coal dust in the lungs, but it can also result from exposure to air pollution, biomass pollution, or cigarette smoke.
To our knowledge, only one case has been reported with the presence of both anthracosis and TB in the same mediastinal LAP nodules.
7) Anthracosis resulting in VFP due to prevascular LAP, especially in the aortic-pulmonary window, is very rare, (3) but it can occur more frequently in developing or underdeveloped countries because of the high risk of exposure to the causative agents.
Stratified analysis showed that, the association between indoor smoke exposure due to traditional baking and anthracosis after stratifying for potential confounding variables remained statistically significant.
Trend analysis indicated that there was an association between anthracosis and indoor smoke exposure due to traditional baking and anthracotic cases had more life span than indoor smoke exposure.
7 years, while the age of patients without anthracosis was 52.
Investigation of the probable effective factors on anthracosis by logistic regression showed that the female gender (OR=2.
This leads to the assumption that, in addition to fossil fuel emission, other factors such as genetics, chronic inflammatory reactions, balance of deposition and clearance of carbon particles, and/or chronic infections such as tuberculosis (TB) play a role in the development of bronchial anthracosis or anthracofibrosis.
16) While some researchers believe that tuberculosis is uncommon in anthracosis and anthracofibrotic lung diseases, (17) others frequently report the coexistence of bronchial anthracosis with tuberculosis.