anteroposterior view

anteroposterior view

; dorsoplantar projection common radiographic view of the foot to image phalanges, metatarsals and midfoot; the X-ray beam is directed 15° from vertical and perpendicular to the dorsal aspect of the midfoot (see Table 1)
Table 1: Common radiographic projections of the foot and ankle
ProjectionVisualization
Foot projections
Dorsiplantar (DP) projection or anteroposterior (AP) viewWeight-bearing with the beam directed at 15° to the frontal plane, to eliminate distortion due to the angulation of the metatarsals and centred on the metatarsal shafts
It is used to visualize the phalanges, metatarsophalangeal joints, the metatarsals and the midfoot
Lateromedial oblique projectionWeight-bearing with the beam angled at 45° to the lateral side of the sagittal plane and centred on the forefoot; or non-weight-bearing, with the beam vertical and foot everted so that the plantar surface is at 45° to the ground surface
It is used to visualize the phalanges, metatarsals, metatarsocuneiform joints and sesamoids, but tends to give an elongated image of bony architecture
Mediolateral oblique projectionWeight-bearing with the beam angled between 25 and 45° to the medial side of the sagittal plane and centred on the forefoot
It is used to visualize the first ray and associated structures, but tends to give an elongated image of bony architecture
Lateral projectionWeight-bearing or non-weight-bearing, with the beam angled at 90° to the lateral aspect of the foot and centred on the mid- or hindfoot
It is used to visualize the profile of the whole foot, but obscures the midtarsal joint, due to superimposition of local structures
Digital projectionThe lateromedial oblique projection is useful to visualize subungual exostoses, especially when the hallux (or affected toe) is raised up on a pad
Sesamoid projection or skyline projectionWeight-bearing, with the metatarsophalangeal joints dorsiflexed to 45° and the beam angled to be parallel to the ground surface on the sagittal plane, and centred on the plantar aspect of the forefoot
It is used to visualize the relationship of the sesamoids with the head of the first metatarsal
Tarsal and ankle projections
Anteroposterior viewWeight-bearing with the beam angled at 90° to the frontal plane and the beam centred on the ankle joint
Used to visualize the ankle mortise and the trochlear surface of the talus
Axial calcaneal projectionWeight-bearing with the beam angled at 45° to the posterior aspect of the sagittal plane with the beam centred on the hindfoot
It is used to visualize calcaneal trauma
Harris-Beath projectionSimilar to the axial calcaneal projection, but the patient is positioned as if making a ski-jump, that is, weight-bearing with the foot dorsiflexed at the ankle and the beam angled at 45° to the posterior aspect of the sagittal plane with the beam centred on the ankle
It is used to visualize the subtalar joint where talar fusions are suspected
References in periodicals archive ?
In plain radiography, anteroposterior view of abdomen is taken either in supine or prone position.
The guide wire was pushed into the desired screw angled position: parallel and just superior to the inferior border of the neck in the anteroposterior view, parallel and just anterior to the posterior border of the neck in the lateral view.
On each plain radiograph of the anteroposterior view, we evaluated the following variables: lateral joint space distance, height of the fibular head, height of the lateral tibial spine, squaring of the lateral femoral condyle, and cupping and obliquity of the lateral tibial plateau [Figure 1].
Left shoulder joint radiographs, including an anteroposterior view of the left AC joint, revealed widening of the AC joint and an increased coracoclavicular (CC) space (measuring 32 mm), along with marked elevation of the clavicle (Figure 1).
A) Anteroposterior view of the antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer in the joint.
These radiographs were taken in the standard posteroanterior view for hands and anteroposterior view for feet
Post-op anteroposterior view of the pelvis shows implantation of the femoral and acetabular components (Titanium cementless press fit).
All individuals between ages 50 70 years of age who would be undergoing pelvic digital x-rays anteroposterior view with radiologically normal x-rays were included in the study.
Anteroposterior view of the X-ray scan showed joint space narrowing and coarse osteophytic formations predominately involving the medial compartment (Figure 1).
The stone burden was determined by radiographic studies, the stone surface area (SA) was calculated by tracing the stone on a KUB (kidney, ureter, bladder) film in the anteroposterior view then using the formula: SA = L x W x ϖ x 0.
Therefore, X-ray of pelvic by anteroposterior view, obturator oblique view and iliac oblique view together with three-dimensional reconstruction of CT must be prepared to evaluate the acetabular defect and determine the reasonable reconstruction way.
Figure 4 is an anteroposterior view of the pelvis, showing thickening of the cortex and bilateral ileopectineal lines (black arrow, the pelvic brim sign) and an irregular trabecular pattern within the right iliac and superior pubic ramus.

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