anterior cervical region

anterior cervical region

[TA]
the area of the neck bounded by the mandible, the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the anterior midline of the neck; it is subdivided into carotid, muscular, submandibular, and submental triangles.

an·te·ri·or cer·vic·al re·gion

(an-tērē-ŏr sĕrvi-kăl rējŏn) [TA]
Area of the neck bounded by the mandible, anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the anterior midline of the neck.
Synonym(s): anterior triangle of the neck, regio cervicalis anterior, trigonum cervicale anterius, trigonium colli anterius, amterior region of the neck.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anterior cervical region between the isthmus and the hyoid bone was completely dissected for identifying the presence of any thyroid tissue.
Therefore, the anterior cervical region has to be dissected carefully during surgery so that no residual thyroid tissue remains.
(4) Other sites in the head and neck that have been affected include the thyroid gland, soft tissues of the anterior cervical region, parotid gland, tonsil, oropharynx, larynx, orbit, choroid and eyelid.
It is localized in the anterior cervical region. The anterior belly divides the region between the hyoid bone and the mandible into two: laterally the submandibular triangle, and medially the submental triangle.
Other sites are the nasopharynx, maxillary sinus, thyroid gland, soft tissues of the anterior cervical region, parotid gland, tonsil, oropharynx, larynx, orbit, and choroids of the eye and eyelid.
An embalmed elderly male cadaver most probably in the sixth decade with no scars in the anterior cervical region suggesting that the subject when alive had not undergone any neck surgery served the purpose of being the material used.
(3) Other sites in the head and neck that have been affected include the nasopharynx, maxillary sinus, thyroid gland, soft tissues of the anterior cervical region, parotid gland, tonsil, oropharynx, larynx, orbit, choroid, and eyelid.
The internal muscle becomes the sternohyoid muscle and runs straight into the anterior cervical region. The lower part of the external muscle grows in the external and inferior direction and becomes the omohyoid, which runs obliquely in the lateral l cervical area14.
We describe the case of a 41-year-old man with hoarseness and a hard, fixed mass in the anterior cervical region. He was referred to our endocrinology service for evaluation of possible thyroid cancer.
A 41-year-old man with an 18-month history of hoarseness was referred to our endocrinology service for evaluation of a mass in the anterior cervical region of 7 months' duration.
The palpable mass in the anterior cervical region was hard, fixed, approximately 10 cm in diameter, and looked exactly like a goiter (figure 1).

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