antenna

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antenna

 [an-ten´ah] (pl. anten´nae)
one of the appendages on the head of arthropods.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

antenna

(ăn-tĕn′ə)
n. pl. an·tennae (-tĕn′ē)
1.
a. Zoology One of the paired, flexible, segmented sensory appendages on the head of an insect, myriapod, or crustacean functioning primarily as an organ of touch.
b. Something likened to this sensory appendage, as in function or form: sensitive public relations antennae.
2. A structure in a photosynthetic organism containing pigment molecules that absorb light energy and transfer it to a reaction center composted of proteins and pigments, where the light energy is converted into chemical energy.

an·ten′nal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

antenna

Imaging
An MRI term for the component of a scanner that sends and/or receives  electromagnetic waves.

Vox populi
A popular term for the instinct that some people have for detecting subtle clues in interpersonal relationships.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

antenna

(pl. antennae) usually one of a pair of many-jointed, whip-like structures present on the head of many arthropods, particularly insects (first appendage on head) and crustaceans (second appendage). Antennae have a sensory function, though in some crustaceans they are used for attachment or swimming.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The present specimen is assigned to an undescribed genus of the family Misophriidae based on the following features: (1) the carapace-like extension covering the first pedigerous somite; (2) the reduction in segmentation (6-segmented) and setation (0, 2, 1, 1, 1, 3) of the antennary exopod; and (3) the absence of an intercoxal sclerite on the fifth legs (see Boxshall and Jaume 2000).