antecedent

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Related to antecedence: conferred, hold off, look into, prospectively

antecedent

 [an″te-se´dent]
a precursor.
plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA) factor XI, one of the coagulation factors.

an·te·ced·ent

(an'te-sē'dent),
A precursor.
[L. antecedo, to go before]

antecedent

/an·te·ce·dent/ (an″tĭ-se´dent) a precursor.
plasma thromboplastin antecedent  (PTA) coagulation factor XI.

antecedent

[an′ti·sē′dənt]
Etymology: L, antecedentem
a thing or period that precedes others in time or order.

antecedent

adjective Existing or occurring before, which may be linked to subsequent events. See Preexisting.

an·te·ced·ent

(an'tĕ-sē'dĕnt)
A precursor.
[L. antecedo, to go before]

an·te·ced·ent

(an'tĕ-sē'dĕnt)
A precursor.
[L. antecedo, to go before]

antecedent

a precursor.

plasma thromboplastin antecedent
PTA; clotting factor XI. See plasma thromboplastin antecedent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inertia azimuthality hypokalemia abut anyone immoral cyma outerwear juxtaposition overtype discontinuities unsalable antecedence powershift frankness.
What we thus have in this latter case is a mode of antecedence determination that does not give rise to predictability and is in fact incompatible with it.
Stress appraisal and coping revisited: Examinint the antecedence of competitive state anxiety with endurance athletes.
On how the issue of Antisthenic antecedence impacts on the philosophy's profile, cf.
Having already demonstrated the antecedence of the dominant inside/outside distinction within the Chavez discourse, so too apparent was the embrace of historical claims by Latin American revolutionary figures such as Marti and Bolivar on the utility of coming together in order to achieve a more promising future.
Social class was given antecedence over caste and ethnicity in the works of such scholars as Dinesh D'Souza, Charles Murray and Clarence Thomas who now privileged Marxist accounts of poverty as a class phenomenon closely tied to the relations of production prevalent in a particular historical period.
17) That is, it is fallacious to infer causation from temporal antecedence.
Max Nordau's work succeeded nevertheless in exerting sufficient influence in Spain to engender progeny--this metaphor is not facetious, given the extent to which the examples to be reviewed rendered his work precursory through reverent acknowledgement of its antecedence.
Anne Sancier celebrates the traditional image of Du Vair as one of the leading precursors in the evolution toward classical style, discerning in his writings the early observance of strict rules of antecedence that would come to characterize modern French prose.
The antecedence of being in change is of a different sort than that of the essence.
For instance, a common type of LDA in various languages involves antecedence by a main clause subject of a reflexive found in a complement clause, often subjunctive, as in the Icelandic example in 1a cited in Ruth Reeves.