antagonistic coevolution

antagonistic coevolution

The presence of adversely selective evolutionary pressure which inhibits one sex from becoming too numerous.

Antagonistic coevolution is a yin-yang process in which the ability of one sex to reproduce is decreased, and the ability of the opposite sex to reproduce is increased; it is has been postulated that AC may be important in speciation, as well as in reproductive physiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
They said with different species of cetaceans, they found evidence of different evolutionary processes - either congruent or antagonistic coevolution of the genitals.
Here we relax this assumption and examine the interaction between mutation accumulation and antagonistic coevolution under the synergistic fitness functions required by the mutational deterministic hypothesis.
These data, in combination with other recent studies, motivate a new model of intersexual selection that is based on antagonistic coevolution between the sexes.
Males are now selected to evolve a more extreme display trait to overcome the increased receiver threshold (by receiver we mean the signal receptor(s) and all associated neurological processing of the display signal), and cyclic antagonistic coevolution ensues.
Such antagonistic coevolution has been demonstrated for the case of male coercion of females (Arnqvist and Rowe 1995; Gowaty 1996a,b,c; Smuts and Smuts 1993; Clutton-Brock and Parker 1995).
Although male-female antagonistic coevolution may play a lesser role in leking species, much of the ornamentation found on these males may be due to male-male signal-receiver antagonistic coevolution (Rice and Holland 1997).
A popular hypothesis, at least in some circles, is that antagonistic coevolution between hosts and their parasites maintains sex in host populations (the Red Queen model; Jaenike 1978; Hamilton 1980; Bell and Maynard Smith 1987; Lively and Apanius 1995).
ratti, it is possible that antagonistic coevolution maintains the sexual life cycle in wild populations.
An alternative explanation for the rapid evolution of seminal proteins is antagonistic coevolution (Rice 1996; Rowe et al.
In our evaluation, the explanations based on cryptic female choice seem unwieldy compared to the simpler explanation based on perpetual male-male and male-female antagonistic coevolution.
While we think that much of the rapid evolution of reproductive tracts can be better explained by antagonistic coevolution, we also think that Eberhard has made a convincing case that cryptic female choice plays an important role in sexual selection, and that this topic needs to be appreciated by students of evolution.