anserine bursitis


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Related to anserine bursitis: Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome, prepatellar bursitis

an·ser·ine bur·si·tis

inflammation of the anserine bursa lying between the pes anserinus and the upper medial surface of the tibia.
Inflammation of the pes anserine bursa between the tibia and the hamstrings’ three tendons which splay out in front of the tibia, fancifully likened to the foot of a goose
Risk factors Overuse, friction and stress on the bursa, especially in runners; attributed to poor training techniques—i.e., no stretching, excessive hill running and sudden increases in mileage, tight hamstrings, obesity, out-turning of the knee or lower leg, and osteoarthritis in knee.Imaging is needed to exclude a fracture
Management Rest, stop activity or substitute a different one until bursitis clears, ice, NSAIDs, aspirin, ibuprofen, local anaesthetics; steroid injections in the bursa

anserine bursitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of the anserine bursa, which occurs in those who heavily exercise the knee–joggers or in obese older ♀ with osteoarthritis of the knee or valgus angulation of knee Clinical Pain on walking and lying with the knees together, tenderness over medial tibia at anserine bursa Management NSAIDs, ice after activity, heat while resting, corticosteroid injection; if valgus angulation of knee while standing, insert a lateral wedge in the shoe to ↓ tension on anserine bursa

an·ser·ine bur·si·tis

(an'sĕr-īn bŭr-sī'tis)
Inflammation of the anserine bursa lying between the pes anserinus and the upper medial surface of the tibia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Brookler and Morgan reported radiographic changes of osteoarthritis in 83.3% of their patients with anserine bursitis.6
In one study conducted on 600 consecutive patients referred to a rheumatology outpatient clinic, 108 received the diagnosis of "soft tissue rheumatism"; among those, 40% had a diagnosis of anserine bursitis.10 In a study from Korea, it was seen in 46.8% of patients with OA.
Anserine Bursitis was clinically present in 23(38.3%) patients and out of this 95.8% were females.
Out of 23 patients with Anserine Bursitis 14 (60.9%) and out of 37 patients without AB 29(78.4%) had OA grade 3 or more as per Kellgren-Lawrence grading scheme.
Anserine Bursitis was present in about one third of patients with painful OA knees, highlighting that clinicians treating patients with OA should be aware of this treatable cause of knee pain.