anserine


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Related to anserine: anserine bursitis

an·ser·ine

(an'ser-in),
1. Resembling or characteristic of a goose.
2. present in muscle and the brain. Synonym(s): N-methylcarnosine
[L. anserinus, fr. anser, goose]
References in periodicals archive ?
Because BoE contains multiple ingredients with antiobesity effects, including DHA, EPA, and anserine (Supplementary Table 1), we therefore determined whether the HFD-induced accumulation of body fat was inhibited by BoE (Figure 4).
Mori et al., "Protective activity of carnosine and anserine against zinc-induced neurotoxicity: a possible treatment for vascular dementia," Metallomics, vol.
Medial knee pain reproduced on palpation of the anatomical site of insertion of the pes anserine tendon complex supports a diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis, with or without edema.
-- Anserine bursitis, an overuse injury, is often misinterpreted as osteoarthritis, according to Dr.
arvensis, Myosotis arvensis, Anagallis arvensis, or Argentina anserine (Westerman & Gerowitt, 2012).
Br.) which are main auxiliary species, along with miscellaneous class grass: silverweed clinquefoil (Potentilla anserine L.), longleaf halerpestes (Halerpestes ruthenica).
Clinically, spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial tibial plateau (SOMTP) is frequently confused with medial eniscus tear and pes anserine bursitis.
Antioxidant activity of carnosine, homocamosine, and anserine present in muscle and brain.
Careful examination allows the practitioner to differentiate between knee arthritis and pes anserine bursitis, or hip arthritis and trochanteric bursitis.
Protective effects of carnosine, homocarnosine and anserine against peroxyl radical-mediated Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase modification.
However, this was stopped after the type of raw material had been changed from species such as capelin and sprat that had an exceptionally high total content of natural antioxidants and co-antioxidants (such as anserine, spermine, trimethylamineoxide and taurine) to species with lower (and more normal) antioxidant content.