anosognosia


Also found in: Wikipedia.

anosognosia

 [an-o″so-no´zhah]
unawareness or denial of a neurological deficit, such as hemiplegia.

a·no·sog·no·si·a

(ă-nō'sog-nō'sē-ă), In the diphthong gn, the g is silent only at the beginning of a word.
Ignorance of the presence of disease, specifically of paralysis. Most often seen in patients with nondominant parietal lobe lesions, who deny presence of hemiparesis.
[G. a- priv. + nosos, disease, + gnōsis, knowledge]

anosognosia

(ə-nō′sŏg-nō′zē-ə, -zhə)
n.
Real or feigned ignorance of the presence of disease, especially of paralysis.

a·no′sog·no′sic (-nō′zĭk) adj.

anosognosia

An apparent unawareness or denial of a functional neurological deficit (e.g., hemiplegia, hemianopia).

a·no·sog·no·si·a

(ă-nōsog-nōsē-ă)
Ignorance of the presence of disease, specifically of paralysis. Most often seen in patients with nondominant parietal lobe lesions, who deny their hemiparesis.
[G. a- priv. + nosos, disease, + gnōsis, knowledge]
References in periodicals archive ?
Anosognosia and self-awareness in multiple sclerosis.
Schizophrenia: Anosognosia, Competency, and Civil Liberties, 11 GEO.
Persons with TBI can also experience anosognosia, which refers to limitations in self-awareness and insight regarding functional capacity and limitations (Lucas & Fleming, 2009).
illnesses may suffer from anosognosia, called "lack of
It is ironic that the legal obstacles for immediate treatment, which do not exist for stroke, often delay administering antipsychotic medication to patients with anosognosia (a neurologic delusional belief that one is not ill, leading to refusal of treatment) for their psychosis and end up harming patients by prolonging their DUP until a court order is obtained to force brain-saving treatment.
Mantzavinos in his book Naturalistic Hermeneutics rejects Dilthey's arguments by following statements: First, self-consciousness does not always lead to valid and true understanding of our conditions, like in anosognosia disease (16).
When a patient reported having no cognitive problems but the family member reported significant difficulties, he was considered to have poor awareness of illness: a neurological disorder known as anosognosia, which is often associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Morris, Implicit awareness in anosognosia: Clinical observations, experimental evidence, and theoretical implications, 4 Cognitive Neuroscience 181, 181 (2013) ("Unawareness of deficits caused by brain damage or neurodegeneration, termed anosognosia, has been demonstrated in a number of different neurological conditions, including in patients with hemiplegia, hemianopia, aphasia, and memory disorder."); see also Terry E.