anosmic


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anosmic

 [an-oz´mik]
1. having no sense of smell.
2. odorless.

an·os·mic

(an-oz'mik),
Relating to anosmia.

an·os·mic

(an-oz'mik)
Relating to anosmia.

anosmia

(a-noz'me-a) [ ¹an- + Gr. osme, stench]
Absence or loss of the sense of smell. anosmic (mik), adjectiveanosmous (mus), adjective Synonym: anodmia; anosphrasia
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References in periodicals archive ?
I think anosmics are always waiting for the day their sense of smell will come back but I don't think mine ever will, as it's been 13 years.
Nevertheless, in our procedures, which aimed to prevent injury to the experimental subjects and to ensure that the behavioral characteristics of the opponents were as homogenous as possible, we used anosmic subjects, which do not provoke such intense agonistic behavior in their opponents.
In addition, patterning is first noticed, and most exaggerated, in the vicinity of the goal box (Ludvigson, 1969; Ludvigson & Sytsma, 1967; Seago, Ludvigson, & Remley, 1970), and anosmic rats do not develop the patterned responding, but will do so if provided with a differential visual cue (Seago, Ludvigson, & Remley, 1970).
Half of the mice were housed during 30 days and employed as experimental or control animals; the remainder were used as <<opponents>> and were temporally rendered anosmic by zinc sulphate.
Symptom severity was rated as absent (0), intermittent (1), or constant (2), and sense of smell was rated as excellent (0), impaired (1), or anosmic (2).
In a careful cross-comparison, Cometto-Muniz and Cain found that the localization procedure produced equivalent results among normosmic and anosmic subjects, as well as results equivalent to forced-choice discrimination among the latter group (26).
In their study, some observers were made anosmic by flushing zinc sulfate through the nasal pathway, and other observers received a sham-anosmia procedure.
Consummatory feeding behavior to amino acids in intact and anosmic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.
The influence of rendering rats anosmic on the poisoned partner effect.
Further support for the odor hypothesis was furnished by Seago, Ludvigson, and Remley (1970), who showed that rats rendered surgically anosmic by removing the olfactory bulbs were incapable of learning this pattern of instrumental behavior, regardless of the trial-administration procedure employed.