anorexia athletica


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A disorder seen in competitive athletics, in which excess exercise is used for weight loss, often associated with anorexia nervosa

an·o·re·xia ath·let·i·ca

(an'ŏ-rek'sē-ă ath-let'i-kă)
Continuum of subclinical eating behaviors of athletes who do not meet the criteria for a true eating disorder, but who practice at least one unhealthful method of weight control (e.g., fasting, vomiting, or use of diet pills, laxatives, or diuretics).

anorexia athletica

, athletic anorexia
A compulsion to exercise, often coupled with reduced caloric intake, and, ultimately, failing health, recurrent injuries, and other impairments. The condition is more common in women than in men but not exclusively found in women. See: anorexia nervosa; female athlete triad
See also: anorexia
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References in periodicals archive ?
In anorexia athletica, then, you see both adaptation and pathology, and this circular dynamic between pride and shame fuels the disease.
While we might say that the biological reality that lower bodyweight leads to better performance justifies the SRGs that require it, the specific ways that reality is negotiated gives us some insight into how and why anorexia athletica might form.
Parker's novel, then, gives us an "affective map" that allows us to connect the biological substrate of the primary-process emotions that Panksepp describes with the SRGs of sport culture in an interaction effect that can produce anorexia athletica.
If one of the criteria for anorexia athletica is "repeatedly exercising beyond the requirements for good health," Parker's novel demonstrates how the SRGs of distance running culture enforce that criterion, granting precedence to those who enact it.
This conscious mapping of the three-part model of the development of self-conscious emotions can then serve as a tool in what Panksepp terms "affective balance therapies"--techniques that aim to shift global attribution patterns and second-level cognitions related to self-evaluations in such a way that the primary-process emotions associated with the SEEKING system--which in the case of anorexia athletica have become dysfunctional and distorted--will be brought back to equilibrium (2009, 19-20).
The variable that then distinguishes those who suffer from anorexia athletica is the experience of shame.
When the particular set of evaluative SRGs that Parker's novel represents is combined with the global-attribution style that sport culture encourages, and these two factors intersect with gender norms and expectations, we are able to chart the course that many follow in the development of anorexia athletica.