anorexic

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Related to anorectics: orexigenic

anorectic

 [an″o-rek´tik]
1. pertaining to anorexia.
2. without appetite.
3. an agent that diminishes or suppresses the appetite for food. Most of the drugs used for this purpose are central nervous system stimulants (the amphetamines and similar sympathomimetic amines). These drugs should not be used in a lifelong weight-control program. Abuse of them, which is frequent, can lead to tolerance and psychological dependence.

an·o·rec·tic

, anoretic (an'ō-rek'tic, -ret'ik),
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or suffering from anorexia, especially anorexia nervosa.
2. An agent that causes anorexia.
Synonym(s): anorexic

anorexic

(ăn′ə-rĕk′sĭk)
adj.
1. Relating to or affected with anorexia nervosa.
2. Anorectic.

an′o·rex′ic n.

anorectic

adjective Referring to anorexia or an anorexigenic agent or effect,
 
Pharmacology
noun Appetite suppressant, see there; anorectic agent.

Psychiatry
noun A person with anorexia nervosa.

anorexic

adjective Lacking a normal appetite. See Anorexia nervosa. Cf Anorectic.

an·o·rec·tic

(an'ŏ-rek'tic)
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or suffering from anorexia, especially anorexia nervosa.
2. An agent that causes anorexia.
Synonym(s): anorexic.

an·o·rec·tic

, anoretic , anorexic (an'ŏ-rek'tic, -ret'ik, -rek'sik)
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or suffering from anorexia, especially anorexia nervosa.
2. An agent that causes anorexia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, other studies have found that weight restored anorectics continue to be obsessed with precision and are fearful of errors (Bastiani, Rao, Weltzin, & Kaye, 1995; Nilsson, Sundbom, & Hagglof, 2008).
Additionally, emaciation is associated both with serious medical morbidity and firmly held beliefs, which are impressively stereotyped, reporting the most of anorectics as a dominant belief that if they eat, they get fat or change shape in some way immediately after eating (2).
The novel is structured as a multileveled narrative portraying the experience and perceptions of Josie, a twenty-five year old student of economics, in a rehabilitation centre for anorectics. The primary narrative line is her first-person account of her daily life in hospital, chronologically ordered but frequently interrupted by the intrusion of flashbacks that add information about her past experiences.
In drawing attention to the coincidences between Tennyson's female characters and Victorian fasters and anorectics it has not been my intention to impose on these fictional figures retrospective clinical diagnoses: such an effort would be both futile and reductive.
While some anorectics may dramatically restrict their food intake, others fall into the equally damaging routine of binging and purging.
Self-suppression of reproduction may be adaptive in conditions of low body fat, bad familial background, or bad mating prospects, but it is obviously maladaptive for the 10% of diagnosed anorectics whose self-imposed starvation endangers their lives.
It is estimated that 1.2 million to 4.7 million people in the United States were prescribed Fen-Phen and Redux, a single anorectic agent.
Although only about half the anorectics interviewed attributed spirituality to their anorexia or recovery, and not all displayed behaviours that could be suggestive of spirituality, nevertheless Garrett reads spirituality into their meanings and stories.
Fenfluramine hydrochloride is a Class IV controlled substance and is classified by the Physician's Desk Reference as an anorectic. As a Class IV controlled substance, it has a low potential for abuse.
Expect more books of wildly varying quality by, for and about anorectics and bulimics, since the publishing industry has found this subject profitable, to judge by the magnitude of Claude-Pierre's promotional tour and by the "substantial six-figure advance" Hyperion paid for Stick Figure, a first-person account by Lori Gottlieb, based on diaries she kept between ages 11 and 13.
Educators, who are informed of the symptoms of anorexia nervosa, are able to identify potential anorectics and refer them to psychological services early in the onset of the disorder and increase the likelihood of a more favorable prognosis.