anorectic drugs

anorectic drugs

Drugs that suppress appetite and may be useful in the management of obesity. They include AMPHETAMINE (amfetamine) and its derivatives, mazindol (Teronc), phentermine (Duromine) and fenfluramine. These drugs have lost status since it became apparent that addiction is possible and that fenfluramine and phentermine can cause valvular heart disease.
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When the natural treatment does not produce effect, the anorectic drugs prescribed by health professionals are used responsibly.
Some anorectic drugs released for marketing do not have long-term use studies, especially in relation to their genotoxic effects.
Studies demonstrate that AAS users also self-administer stimulant and anorectic drugs, such as amphetamines and their derivatives, to sustain a fine self-image (5).
The popularity of anorectic drugs among the general public and many doctors should also be taken into consideration.
TABLE 1 Methods for treating obesity (21) Goal Method Reduction of caloric Low-calorie fat and carbohydrate intake substitutes; drugs to impair absorption; restrictive bariatric surgery; behavior modification Reduction of appetite Behavior training; anorectic drugs; bypass bariatric surgery; controlling environmental stimuli Increase in energy Exercise or elevation of metabolic rate expenditure (eg, by drug treatment) Direct removal of fat Surgery (liposuction); agents to impair fat storage Reprinted with permission from ASPET Bloom SR, Kuhajda FP, Laher I, et al.
Effects of antenatal exposure to anorectic drugs. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 129 (6): 637-42.
Items that cannot be prescribed and are pharmaceutical services not covered by the department include anorectic drugs or combinations including such drugs, biological and drugs available without charge from the Illinois Department of Public Health or other agencies, any vaccine, drug, or serum which is provided primarily for preventive purposes (e.g.
A number of drugs may influence the nutritional status of vitamins by decreasing food intake (anorectic drugs), inducing malabsorption or increasing energy expenditure, however specific drug-nutrient interactions have been reported.
Anorectic drugs such as sibutramine (Meridia[R]) act to suppress appetite and are prescribed for some obese people.
Appetite suppressants, or anorectic drugs, are not new, nor are these two drugs new.
Behavior-modification therapy is often used as an adjunct to therapies such as exercise, low-calorie diets, and anorectic drugs. This approach has been used in a variety of settings, such as the workplace, and by nonprofit and commercial self-help groups.