anomie


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an·o·mie

(an'ō-mē),
1. Lawlessness; absence or weakening of social norms or values, with corresponding erosion of social cohesion.
2. In psychiatry, absence or weakening of individual norms or values; characterized by anxiety, isolation, and personal disorientation.
[Fr., fr. G. anomia, lawlessness]

anomie

[an′əmē]
a state of apathy, alienation, anxiety, personal disorientation, and distress resulting from the loss of social norms and goals previously valued. Also spelled anomy.

anomie

Neurology
Nominal aphasia, anomic aphasia.
 
Psychiatry
Alienation.
 
Social medicine
Lawlessness; bereft of societal control or unresponsiveness to social norms; e.g., sociopathy.

an·o·mie

(an'ŏ-mē)
Social instability as a result of a loss of accepted standards and values.
[Fr., fr. G. anomia, lawlessness]

anomie

Lack of moral principle, whether in an individual or in a society.

anomie (aˑ·n·mē),

n a sociological phenomenon in which individuals display profound lack of expected social behaviors, often seen when people are uprooted from their places of origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Merton (1938), anomie refers to a societal imbalance where cultural or materialistic goals are overemphasized at the expense of the institutionalized or legitimate goals within a society.
This methodology is basic for the criticism of crime novels which I have developed in my analyses using anomie as a key.
In terms of the audiences likely to benefit from this book, Anomie and Violence would be of interest to scholars with Indonesia area expertise, public policy practitioners who work on Indonesia and academics who examine peace building.
The final section brings this analysis up-to-date by focusing on the Governance of Britain agenda initiated by Gordon Brown since he became Prime Minister in June 2007 and how this fits within the broader themes and issues associated with constitutional anomie discussed in this article.
Poverty, socioeconomic change, institutional anomie and homicide.
The first selection of poems, from Resisting the Anomie (see WLT 70:2, p.
Gladding (1977) found that adolescents who reported positive feeling about school and/or religious belief had significantly lower anomie.
It breeds an ennui expressed through a culture of irony, for the winners, and anomie, for the rest.
The program's purpose is to address two concerns expressed by part-time faculty: (1) part-time faculty reported a sense of disassociation or anomie in terms of their relationship with institution; and (2) part-time faculty also felt that they needed a better "tool kit" to improve their effectiveness in the classroom.
A blurb on the first issue proclaimed the book as a "guided tour to hell conducted by a man who broke out" It was a consistently chilling account of institutional life and the inherent violence and anomie of Brown's world.
The film is ferociously claustrophobic, not simply because the principals are confined to cars and restaurants or because Ki-Yong refuses to cut away or let us look away, but because it's penned-in quality perfectly mirrores the character's anomie.