anomic


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Related to anomic: anomic aphasia

anomic

Amnestic aphasia Neurology Loss of the ability to name objects

anomie

, anomy (an′ŏ-mē) [Fr. from Gr. anomia, lawlessness]
A term coined by the French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858–1917) to indicate a condition similar to alienation. The individual feels there has been a disintegration of his or her norms and values. Durkheim felt such individuals were prone to take their lives because of the anxiety, isolation, and alienation that they experience.
anomic (ă-nom′ik, ă-nō′mik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
They follow Durkheim in noting that traditional societies because of their greater emphasis on social solidarity and group identification are much less anomic. As far as it goes, this is clearly true.
To him presence of too many norms to follow and not a single one that individual can relate to his subjective conditions can result in anomic feelings.
The social world evoked in Robocop or Total Recall is dangerous, lonely, chaotic, and deeply hostile, littered with industrial ruins and seething masses of anomic humanity.
"To the extent that a person lacks that coherence, he is anomic, acting on impulse or whim...."[7] Now many drug users may be anomic; if they are both devoted to stopping taking drugs and yet still take them, it seems manifest that their lives lack the sort of coherence that is characteristic of the autonomous person.
All the self-regulating mechanisms of small community life disappear, and the result is a wandering, anomic, rootless individual, ready to regress into senseless behavior at the first occasion.
After the war interpretations of fascism revealed the dangers of ethnic prejudice and validated ethnic identity as a bulwark against the anomic individuals who seemed to be the movement's foot soldiers, but at the same time the victory led many toward a sort of sacralization of the universalistic aspects of the American national ideology and intensified the search for a modal "American character" that was rarely ethnic.
First, in Division 1, "Heidegger and the Politics of Productionist Metaphysics: The Longing for a New World of Work," Zimmerman casts floods of light on Heidegger's writings on modernity and technology by placing them in their social, political, and intellectual context: the reaction, among intellectuals on the German right, to the traumas and pathologies of a rapidly modernizing society, for example, the fragmentation of small-scale, organic communities; the rise of an alienated, anomic, "rootlessly" cosmopolitan urban-industrial society; the shattering debacle of the Great War and the years of chaos that followed.
Radicalism was the cultural posture of the new intellectual generation who attended colonial schools during the 1920s, and it became a medium for their self-identification in their anomic situation with regard to their indigenous tradition.
Quite simply, when queried about their motivates for joining the peyote movement, Navajos did not mentioned livestock reduction or "anomic feelings of aimlessness." They cited traditional Navajo religious motivations, namely, the search for cure from disease.
* Anomic or amnesic aphasia occurs in the milder cases of aphasia.
They feel powerless and anomic, and seek solace within themselves by projecting their being onto an all-powerful Being outside the self.