anomaly

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anomaly

 [ah-nom´ah-le]
marked deviation from normal. adj., adj anom´alous.
Axenfeld's anomaly a developmental anomaly characterized by a circular opacity of the posterior peripheral cornea, and caused by an irregularly thickened, axially displaced Schwalbe's ring.
congenital anomaly (developmental anomaly) absence, deformity, or excess of body parts as the result of faulty development of the embryo.
Ebstein's anomaly see ebstein's anomaly.
May-Hegglin anomaly a rare dominantly inherited disorder of blood cell morphology, characterized by RNA-containing cytoplasmic inclusions (similar to Döhle bodies) in granulocytes, by large, poorly granulated platelets, and by thrombocytopenia.

a·nom·a·ly

(ă-nom'ă-lē),
A birth defect caused by a structural abnormality or a marked deviation from the average or norm; anything that is structurally unusual or irregular or contrary to a general rule for example, a congenital defect. There are four clinically significant types of anomaly: malformation, disruption, deformation, and dysplasia.
[G. anōmalia, irregularity]

anomaly

An abnormal thing; a marked deviation from the norm or a standard, especially due to a congenital (birth or hereditary) defect.

anomaly

An abnormal thing Pediatrics A marked deviation from the norm or a standard, especially due to a congenital–birth or hereditary defect. See Alder-Reilly anomaly, May-Hegglin anomaly, Pelger-Huët anomaly, Pseudo-Chediak-Higashi anomaly, Pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly.

a·nom·a·ly

(ă-nom'ă-lē)
A birth defect caused by a structural abnormality or a marked deviation from the average or normal standard; anything that is structurally unusual, irregular, or contrary to a general rule, especially a congenital defect.
[G. anōmalia, irregularity]

anomaly

Anything differing from the normal.

a·nom·a·ly

(ă-nom'ă-lē)
Birth defect caused by structural abnormality or marked deviation from the average or norm; anything structurally unusual or irregular or contrary to a general rule e.g., a congenital defect.
[G. anōmalia, irregularity]

Patient discussion about anomaly

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

More discussions about anomaly
References in periodicals archive ?
Anomalistic month (cycle of perigean tides) = 27.555 days; synodic month (cycle of Moon's phases in which there are two sets of spring and neap tides) = 29.531 days; tropical month (cycle in which Moon crosses the Equator twice) = 27.322 days.
Note that if one used 246 anomalistic months (18.558 years), 247 anomalistic months (18.634 years), or 252 anomalistic months (19.011 years), the multiples of other types of months are not nearly as closely matched as with 18.03 years.
Anomalistic psychology: Exploring paranormal belief and experience.
Anomalistic psychology: Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan.
These qualities are inherent within paranormal experiences and mirror the central concerns of anomalistic experiential research as identified by Braud (2004); authenticity, underlying process, and phenomenology.
IPA provides anomalistic psychological researchers with a unique approach for understanding how percipients find meaning in and make sense of their paranormal experiences.
So while some respected researchers in our midst like to use this anomalistic psychology term, in my mind, and for the purposes of this talk, it has come to represent the prejudged and prejudiced type of psychological approach that supposes that paranormal belief is degenerate and that paranormal experiences are delusional.
So while anomalistic psychology has the objective of reducing the unknown to the known--as Professor Zangari (2011) reminded us yesterday--there is an inherent danger of assuming that we really do fully comprehend the universe already, which, at its core, projects a sort of ignorant arrogance, because, for me at least, the more I learn the more I realise how little I know.
Essentially then, by restricting the agenda to maintaining that paranormal experiences really are just normal experiences--and not potentially phenomena currently inexplicable by scientific knowledge--the paranormal experience itself is being wholly appropriated by the socalled skeptical anomalistic psychology community.
Take Richard Wiseman's (2011) latest best-selling book on anomalistic psychology that came out this year, Paranormality: Why We See What Isn't There.