anomaly

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anomaly

 [ah-nom´ah-le]
marked deviation from normal. adj., adj anom´alous.
Axenfeld's anomaly a developmental anomaly characterized by a circular opacity of the posterior peripheral cornea, and caused by an irregularly thickened, axially displaced Schwalbe's ring.
congenital anomaly (developmental anomaly) absence, deformity, or excess of body parts as the result of faulty development of the embryo.
Ebstein's anomaly see ebstein's anomaly.
May-Hegglin anomaly a rare dominantly inherited disorder of blood cell morphology, characterized by RNA-containing cytoplasmic inclusions (similar to Döhle bodies) in granulocytes, by large, poorly granulated platelets, and by thrombocytopenia.

a·nom·a·ly

(ă-nom'ă-lē),
A birth defect caused by a structural abnormality or a marked deviation from the average or norm; anything that is structurally unusual or irregular or contrary to a general rule for example, a congenital defect. There are four clinically significant types of anomaly: malformation, disruption, deformation, and dysplasia.
[G. anōmalia, irregularity]

anomaly

/anom·a·ly/ (ah-nom´ah-le) marked deviation from normal, especially as a result of congenital or hereditary defects.anom´alous
Alder's anomaly  an autosomal dominant condition in which leukocytes of the myelocytic series, and sometimes all leukocytes, contain coarse azurophilic granules.
Chédiak-Higashi anomaly  see under syndrome.
congenital anomaly  a developmental anomaly present at birth.
developmental anomaly 
1. a structural abnormality of any type.
2. a defect resulting from imperfect embryonic development.
Ebstein's anomaly  a malformation of the tricuspid valve, usually associated with an atrial septal defect.
Enlarge picture
Ebstein's anomaly, showing displacement of the septal and posterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle and accompanied by a patent foramen ovale.
May-Hegglin anomaly  an autosomal dominant disorder of blood cell morphology, characterized by RNA-containing cytoplasmic inclusions (similar to Döhle bodies) in granulocytes, by large, poorly granulated platelets, and by thrombocytopenia.
Pelger's nuclear anomaly  Pelger-Huët nuclear a. (1).
Pelger-Huët nuclear anomaly 
1. a hereditary or acquired defect in which the nuclei of neutrophils and eosinophils appear rodlike, spherical, or dumbbell-shaped; the nuclear structure is coarse and lumpy.
2. an acquired condition with similar features, occurring in certain anemias and leukemias.

anomaly

[ənom′əlē]
Etymology: Gk, anomalos, irregular
1 a deviation from what is regarded as normal.
2 a congenital malformation, such as the absence of a limb or the presence of an extra finger. anomalous, adj.

anomaly

An abnormal thing; a marked deviation from the norm or a standard, especially due to a congenital (birth or hereditary) defect.

anomaly

An abnormal thing Pediatrics A marked deviation from the norm or a standard, especially due to a congenital–birth or hereditary defect. See Alder-Reilly anomaly, May-Hegglin anomaly, Pelger-Huët anomaly, Pseudo-Chediak-Higashi anomaly, Pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly.

a·nom·a·ly

(ă-nom'ă-lē)
A birth defect caused by a structural abnormality or a marked deviation from the average or normal standard; anything that is structurally unusual, irregular, or contrary to a general rule, especially a congenital defect.
[G. anōmalia, irregularity]

anomaly

Anything differing from the normal.

a·nom·a·ly

(ă-nom'ă-lē)
Birth defect caused by structural abnormality or marked deviation from the average or norm; anything structurally unusual or irregular or contrary to a general rule e.g., a congenital defect.
[G. anōmalia, irregularity]

anomaly

marked deviation from normal. For specific anomalies see under anatomical location.

developmental anomaly
absence, deformity or excess of body parts as the result of faulty development of the embryo.
lethal anomaly
a defect which is incompatible with life and leads to the natural death or euthanasia on humane grounds of the neonate concerned.
sex-limited anomaly
limited in its occurrence by the sex of the neonate, e.g. cryptorchidism.
sex-linked anomaly
the gene responsible for the defect is located on the X or the Y chromosome, the sex determinative ones.

Patient discussion about anomaly

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

More discussions about anomaly
References in periodicals archive ?
Anomalistic psychology: Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan.
These qualities are inherent within paranormal experiences and mirror the central concerns of anomalistic experiential research as identified by Braud (2004); authenticity, underlying process, and phenomenology.
IPA provides anomalistic psychological researchers with a unique approach for understanding how percipients find meaning in and make sense of their paranormal experiences.
So while some respected researchers in our midst like to use this anomalistic psychology term, in my mind, and for the purposes of this talk, it has come to represent the prejudged and prejudiced type of psychological approach that supposes that paranormal belief is degenerate and that paranormal experiences are delusional.
So while anomalistic psychology has the objective of reducing the unknown to the known--as Professor Zangari (2011) reminded us yesterday--there is an inherent danger of assuming that we really do fully comprehend the universe already, which, at its core, projects a sort of ignorant arrogance, because, for me at least, the more I learn the more I realise how little I know.
Essentially then, by restricting the agenda to maintaining that paranormal experiences really are just normal experiences--and not potentially phenomena currently inexplicable by scientific knowledge--the paranormal experience itself is being wholly appropriated by the socalled skeptical anomalistic psychology community.
Take Richard Wiseman's (2011) latest best-selling book on anomalistic psychology that came out this year, Paranormality: Why We See What Isn't There.
Not only does this example demonstrate the inherently dodgy use of estimated probabilities in this sort of reasoning, but Wiseman (2011) and many other anomalistic psychologists (e.
So what I am asking for is the reclamation of the anomalous experience from anomalistic psychology.
So I am asking for the reclamation of the anomalistic experience itself from the arm's length stylisation of it as a dysfunctional dimension of being human.