anode

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anode

 [an´ōd]
the electrode at which oxidation occurs and to which anions are attracted. adj., adj ano´dal.

an·ode

(an'ōd),
1. The positive pole of a galvanic battery or the electrode connected with it; an electrode toward which negatively charged ions (anions) migrate (for example, in electrophoresis); a positively charged electrode. Compare: cathode.
2. The portion, usually made of tungsten, of an x-ray tube from which x-rays are released by bombardment by cathode rays (electrons).
Synonym(s): positive electrode
[G. anodos, a way up, fr. ana, up, + hodos, a way]

anode

/an·ode/ (an´ōd) the electrode at which oxidation occurs and to which anions are attracted.ano´dal

anode

the electrode at which oxidation occurs. anodal, adj.

an·ode

(an'ōd)
1. The positive pole of a galvanic battery or the electrode connected with it; an electrode toward which negatively charged ions (anions) migrate; a positively charged electrode.
2. The portion, usually made of tungsten, of an x-ray tube from which x-rays are released by bombardment by cathode rays (electrons).
[G. anodos, a way up, fr. ana, up, + hodos, a way]

anode

a positively charged electrode to which negatively charged ions move. Compare CATHODE.

Anode

The positive electrode to which an electromagnetic current flows.

an·ode

(an'ōd)
1. The positive pole of a galvanic battery or the electrode connected with it; an electrode toward which negatively charged ions (anions) migrate; a positively charged electrode.
2. The portion of an x-ray tube from which x-rays are released by bombardment by cathode rays.
[G. anodos, a way up, fr. ana, up, + hodos, a way]

anode (an´ōd),

n the electrically positive terminal of a roentgen ray (radiographic) tube; a tungsten block embedded in a copper stem and set at an angle of 20° or 45° to the cathode. The anode emits roentgen rays (radiographs) from the point of impact of the electronic stream from the cathode.
anode, rotating,
n an anode that rotates during radiograph production to present a constantly different focal spot to the electron stream and to permit use of small focal spots or higher tube voltages without overheating the tube.

anode

the positive electrode or pole to which negative ions are attracted.
The stationary anode in an x-ray tube is a solid bar of copper with an inset of tungsten on the face of the bar opposite the cathode filament. The tungsten target has a high melting point to withstand the intense heat of the x-ray beam—the copper conducts the heat away.

anode-film distance
see focal-film distance.
rotating anode
an x-ray tube in which the anode rotates when x-rays are being produced. This means that there is a larger effective target surface of the anode which can be available to generate x-rays.
stationary anode
a non-rotating anode in an x-ray tube so that the target surface is comparatively small.
References in periodicals archive ?
Photoconductivity of germanium nanowire arrays incorporated in anodic aluminum oxide.
Thick and Dense Anodic Oxide Layers Formed on Aluminum in Sulphuric Acid Bath, J.
Where C, Cs shows capacitance and volumetric capacitance respectively, of different anolyte at scan rate v giving maximum anodic peak current I, on electrode area A.
Three main techniques of anodization such as mild anodization, hard anodization and pulse anodization are adopted for the fabrication of self-organized anodic aluminum oxide nanostructure [8].
Anodic oxidation of the resulting oxide film thickness, with a certain degree of strength and hardness, the corrosion of the magnesium substrate has a certain degree of protection, wear resistance and corrosion resistance than the chemical conversion film.
The anodic chamber was inoculated using domestic waste water supplemented with 10% of nutrient source.
Sample PC also displayed a low rate of anodic current density rise, and resistance to high anodic polarization.
c are the Tafel slopes of the anodic and cathodic parts of the Tafel plot, respectively, and Rp is the polarization resistance.
6], produce well-defined anodic and cathodic branches on the current-voltage curves with the peaks separated by 59/n mV, where n is the number of electrons involved in the oxidation and reduction steps.
The voltammograms of the metal complex at different scan rates expressed that with the increase of scan rate the peak currents for both cathodic and anodic peaks increases.
One element, usually the anodic element of an alloy, corrodes away, leaving the cathodic element.