anneal

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anneal

 [ah-nēl´]
1. to heat a material, such as glass or metal, followed by controlled cooling to remove internal stresses and induce a desired degree of toughness, temper, or softness of the material.
2. to homogenize an amalgam alloy ingot by heating it in an oven.
3. to heat a material, such as gold foil, to volatilize and drive off impurities from its surface, and to increase its cohesive properties.

an·neal

(an-nēl'),
1. To soften or temper a metal by controlled heating and cooling; the process makes a metal more easily adapted, bent, or swaged, and often less brittle.
2. In dentistry, to heat gold leaf preparatory to its insertion into a cavity, to remove adsorbed gases and other contaminants.
3. The pairing of complementary single strands of DNA; or of DNA-RNA.
4. The attachment of the ends of two macromolecules, for example, two microtubules annealing to form one longer microtubule.
5. In molecular biology, annealing is a process in which short sections of single-stranded DNA from one source are bound to a filter and incubated with single-stranded, radioactively conjugated DNA from a second source. Where the two sets of DNA possess complementary sequences of nucleotides, bonding occurs. The degree of relatedness (homology) of the two sets of DNA is then estimated according to the radioactivity level of the filter. This technique plays a central role in the classification of bacteria and viruses. Synonym(s): nucleic acid hybridization
6. To renature proteins or polynucleic acids by slow cooling.
[A.S. anaelan, to burn]

an·neal

(ă-nēl')
Process by which oligonucleotides affix to targeted DNA sequences.
[A.S. anaelan, to burn]

an·neal

(ă-nēl')
In dentistry, to heat gold leaf preparatory to its insertion into a cavity to remove adsorbed gases and other contaminants.
[A.S. anaelan, to burn]
References in periodicals archive ?
7), remains more or less constant as long as the anneal temperature does not exceed 375 K.
In the specimen annealed at 375 K, the grains have grown out slightly (Fig.
For the specimen annealed at 500 K, this strain is approximately 0.2%.
However, the specimens annealed at 400 K and 450 K have partly recrystallized.
The microstructures of the specimens annealed at 400 K and 450 K are considered to be a mixture of the microstructures of the specimens annealed at 375 K and 500 K.
This amplification efficiency approaches that of PCR, and with similar specificity as defined by the need for two primers to anneal to matching target sequences.
Where no product is formed, the probe cannot anneal and is chemically degraded by the detection procedure without emitting a signal.
Figure 9b shows a fracture surface of the annealed sample VF5, and it is quite obvious that the particles flattened more.
Some of the annealed latex coatings were immersed in deionized water for 24h at room temperature (compare Table 2).
On the top surfaces of samples RW1 and RW2, which had been annealed at 20 and 30[degrees]C before being rewetted, the particles that were previously partly flattened, separated and rounded back into spherical shape, as shown in Figs.
On the top surface of sample RW3, which was rewetted VF3 annealed at 40[degrees]C, some particles separated and rounded up; yet, the others remained in contact with and partly flattened against each other, as shown in Fig.