diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

(redirected from ankylosing hyperostosis)

dif·fuse id·i·o·path·ic skel·e·tal hy·per·os·to·sis (DISH),

a generalized spinal and extraspinal articular disorder characterized by calcification and ossification of ligaments, particularly of the anterior longitudinal ligament; distinct from ankylosing spondylitis or degenerative joint disease.

dif·fuse id·i·o·path·ic skel·e·tal hy·per·os·to·sis

(DISH) (di-fyūs' id'ē-ō-path'ik skel'ĕ-tăl hī'pĕr-os-tō'sis)
A generalized spinal and extraspinal articular disorder characterized by calcification and ossification of ligaments, particularly of the anterior longitudinal ligament; distinct from ankylosing spondylitis or degenerative joint disease.
Synonym(s): Forestier disease.

Forestier,

Jacques, French rheumatologist, 1890–.
Forestier disease - a generalized spinal and extraspinal articular disorder characterized by calcification and ossification of ligaments. Synonym(s): diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is also known as ankylosing hyperostosis, characterized by flowing calcification of paraspinal ligaments, commonly affecting thoracic spine followed by the lumbar and cervical spine.
Ankylosing hyperostosis. Clinical and radiological features.
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) (also called ankylosing hyperostosis, Forestier's disease, or spondylitis ossificans ligamentosa) is an age-related chronic condition whose principal manifestation is new bone formation without degenerative, traumatic, or postinfection changes (1).