ankle equinus

ankle equinus

congenital or acquired functional compromise of ankle joint sagittal plane motion with less than 10° of available joint dorsiflexion when the foot is in subtalar joint-neutral; associated with anterior ankle impingement, bone anomalies (e.g. ankle bone block [ see anterior ankle impingement] or previous bone injury) and soft-tissue anomalies (e.g. tight Achilles tendon), forefoot pathologies (e.g. equinus forefoot), neurological problems (e.g. toe walking associated with spasticity), compensation for leg length discrepancy, or habitual use of high-heeled shoes; ankle equinus is nearly always associated with rearfoot varus
References in periodicals archive ?
In treatment phase serial manipulations and casting are done to gradually correct the deformity and a percutaneous tenotomy of the Achilles tendon to correct the residual ankle equinus.
An ankle equinus deformity is basically one in which the Achilles tendon is shorter than needed to allow adequate dorsiflexion during the gait cycle.
Manipulation method for the treatment of ankle equinus.
Currently, intervention for ankle equinus in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is preventive, symptomatic, or palliative depending on the degree of the limitation in range and its effect on activity.
Longitudinal data is lacking to determine whether ankle equinus is the primary cause of idiopathic toe-walking or is a consequence of chronically walking on tiptoes.
The classical orthopaedic definition of ankle equinus is a plantarflexed foot as is often seen in neurological conditions such as cerebral palsy.
In fact, the term muscular ankle equinus has been coined .
In fact, muscular ankle equinus, or gastrocnemius contracture, has been linked to various foot conditions.
Various authors claim that ankle equinus may be a significant causative factor of a variety of lower extremity conditions (3), ranging from low back pain, hyperextended knees, hallux rigidus, calcaneal spurs (15), chronic plantar heel pain16, foot nerve entrapment (17), Achilles tendinopathy, Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction, plantar fasciitis (10), metatarsalgia18 and forefoot callus (19).