anisakiasis

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anisakiasis

 [an″ĭ-sah-ki´ah-sis]
infection with the third-stage larvae of the roundworm Anisakis marina, which burrow into the stomach wall, producing an eosinophilic granulomatous mass. Infection is acquired by eating undercooked marine fish.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·i·sa·ki·a·sis

(an'i-să-kī'ă-sis),
Infection of the intestinal wall by larvae of Anisakis marina and other genera of anisakid nematodes (Contracaecum, Phocanema), characterized by intestinal eosinophilic granuloma and symptoms resembling those of peptic ulcer or tumor.
[G. anisos, unequal, + akis, a point, + -iasis, condition]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anisakiasis

Infestation of the upper GI tract (stomach, small intestine) mucosae by larvae of the family Anisakidae, which are common ascaroid parasites of marine fish; human infestation results from eating raw fish (e.g., sushi). The larval stage of Anisakis simplex and Phocanema (Pseudoterranova decipiens) account for all US cases of anisakiasis; another anasakine, Contracecum, may rarely cause anisakiasis.
 
Clinical findings
A simplex (abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea) eosinophilia with occult blood in stool if gastric anisakiasis; leukocytosis without eosinophilia if intestinal anisakiasis.

P decipiens
Few significant symptoms, as it does not penetrate gastric or intestinal wall.
 
Management gastric anisakiasis
Endoscopic removal of larva.

Management intestinal anisakiasis
Surgical excision of involved intestine.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

anisakiasis

Parasitology Infestation of the upper GI tract–stomach, small intestine mucosae by larvae of the family Anisakidae, which are common ascaroid parasites of marine fish; human infestation results from eating raw fish–eg, sushi; the larval stage of Anisakis simplex and PhocanemaPseudoterranova decipiens account for all US cases of anisakiasis; another anasakine, Contracecum, may rarely cause anisakiasis Clinical A simplex–abdominal pain, N&V, diarrhea, eosinophilia with occult blood in stool, if gastric anisakiasis; leukocytosis sans eosinophilia if intestinal anisakiasis; P decipiens—few significant Sx, as it does not penetrate gastric or intestinal wall Management-gastric anisakiasis–endoscopic removal of larva Intestinal anisakiasis–surgical excision of involved intestine. See Sushi.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

anisakiasis

Herring worm disease caused by the larvae of worms of the Anisakidae family. A parasitic infection acquired by eating raw herrings. A fibrous mass (granuloma) forms in the intestine causing fever, colic and intermittent obstruction. Surgical treatment may be needed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Nagasawa et al., "Anisakidae and anisakidosis," Progress in Clinical Parasitology, vol.
In humans, Anisakidae are responsible for a zoonotic disease called anisakidosis (Kassai et al., 1988), which may be associated to either noninvasive forms, generally asymptomatic, or invasive forms, characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms (acute or chronic).
In the last decade, there have been about 20,000 cases of human anisakidosis, with a marked prevalence in Japan (90% of the cases) (Abe, 2008; Bucci et al., 2013).
To the Editor: Anisakidosis is an emerging foodborne zoonosis caused by nematode larvae of the Anisakinae subfamily, which includes the genera Anisakis, Pseudoterranova, and Contracecum (1).
Probable emergencia de anisakidosis por larvas de Anisakis physeteris durante el fenomeno El Nino 1997-98 en la costa peruana.
Diagnosis of a case of gastric anisakidosis by PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.
Reported cases of anisakidosis (worm infection) in man have increased recently in many countries (Lopez-Penas et al.