anisakiasis

anisakiasis

 [an″ĭ-sah-ki´ah-sis]
infection with the third-stage larvae of the roundworm Anisakis marina, which burrow into the stomach wall, producing an eosinophilic granulomatous mass. Infection is acquired by eating undercooked marine fish.

an·i·sa·ki·a·sis

(an'i-să-kī'ă-sis),
Infection of the intestinal wall by larvae of Anisakis marina and other genera of anisakid nematodes (Contracaecum, Phocanema), characterized by intestinal eosinophilic granuloma and symptoms resembling those of peptic ulcer or tumor.
[G. anisos, unequal, + akis, a point, + -iasis, condition]

anisakiasis

/an·i·sa·ki·a·sis/ (an″ĭ-sah-ki´ah-sis) infection with the third-stage larvae of the roundworm Anisakis marina, which burrow into the stomach wall, producing an eosinophilic granulomatous mass. Infection is acquired by eating undercooked marine fish.

anisakiasis

[an′i·sə·kī′ə·sis]
infection of humans or other animals with a nematode of the family Anisakidae, usually Anisakis marina. Human infection is usually caused by third-stage larvae eaten in sushi and undercooked infected marine fish such as herring. The larvae then burrow into the stomach wall, producing an eosinophilic granulomatous mass. The infection is distributed worldwide, but occurs with higher incidence in places where raw fish is consumed, such as Japan. Also called eosinophilic granuloma.

anisakiasis

Infestation of the upper GI tract (stomach, small intestine) mucosae by larvae of the family Anisakidae, which are common ascaroid parasites of marine fish; human infestation results from eating raw fish (e.g., sushi). The larval stage of Anisakis simplex and Phocanema (Pseudoterranova decipiens) account for all US cases of anisakiasis; another anasakine, Contracecum, may rarely cause anisakiasis.
 
Clinical findings
A simplex (abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea) eosinophilia with occult blood in stool if gastric anisakiasis; leukocytosis without eosinophilia if intestinal anisakiasis.

P decipiens
Few significant symptoms, as it does not penetrate gastric or intestinal wall.
 
Management gastric anisakiasis
Endoscopic removal of larva.

Management intestinal anisakiasis
Surgical excision of involved intestine.

anisakiasis

Parasitology Infestation of the upper GI tract–stomach, small intestine mucosae by larvae of the family Anisakidae, which are common ascaroid parasites of marine fish; human infestation results from eating raw fish–eg, sushi; the larval stage of Anisakis simplex and PhocanemaPseudoterranova decipiens account for all US cases of anisakiasis; another anasakine, Contracecum, may rarely cause anisakiasis Clinical A simplex–abdominal pain, N&V, diarrhea, eosinophilia with occult blood in stool, if gastric anisakiasis; leukocytosis sans eosinophilia if intestinal anisakiasis; P decipiens—few significant Sx, as it does not penetrate gastric or intestinal wall Management-gastric anisakiasis–endoscopic removal of larva Intestinal anisakiasis–surgical excision of involved intestine. See Sushi.

anisakiasis

Herring worm disease caused by the larvae of worms of the Anisakidae family. A parasitic infection acquired by eating raw herrings. A fibrous mass (granuloma) forms in the intestine causing fever, colic and intermittent obstruction. Surgical treatment may be needed.

anisakiasis

the disease in humans caused by infestation with one of the worms of the genus Anisakis. See also phocanema, terranova and contracaecum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Owing to changes in food habits, anisakiasis is a growing disease in Western countries, which should be suspected in patients with a history of ingestion of raw or uncooked fish," Dr.
Although cases are mainly seen in Japan, patients in Europe are now presenting with anisakiasis, a disease caused by parasitic nematodes (worms) burrowing into the stomach wall or intestine.
They added that most cases of anisakiasis to date had been reported in Japan, but warned: "It has been increasingly recognised in Western countries.
I eat raw fish regularly and the only thing I really worry about is anisakiasis from anisakid roundworms," said Blanar.
Possible influence of the ENSO phenomenon on the pathoecology of diphyllobothriasis and anisakiasis in ancient Chinchorro populations.
Anisakiasis, the disease they infect us with, was incorrectly thought to be spread by only freshwater fish the way tapeworms were commonly spread from homemade gefilte fish.
Hence, a full dietary history is crucial to identify possible exposure risks, as it would also be for anisakiasis ('sushi worms') and gnathostomiasis from raw fish, paragonimiasis from freshwater crabs and crayfish, and trichinosis following ingestion of raw or undercooked pork or more exotic meats such as wild boar, horse, bear or seal, depending on geographic location.